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Cinematheque

Cinematheque . Virtual Cinema 

Virtual Cinema

Support the Cinematheque from home!

Theatrical screenings in our auditorium resumed on July 1, but these films can be viewed online from the comfort of home. Watching them through the links below supports the Cinematheque! New titles will be added every week. 

Previous virtual offerings may still be available to stream. See Film Schedule pages for titles, descriptions, and links.

Asia

Israel | 2020 | Ruthy Pribar

Winner of nine 2020 Israeli Film Academy awards including Best Film and Best Actress (Alena Yiv), this understated, unsentimental drama charts the resurgent love between a young single mother and her emotionally distant teenage daughter (Shira Haas of Unorthodox) after one of them becomes seriously ill. "Every formal element of Asia serves to illustrate and enrich the tricky, evolving relationship at its center." –Variety. Subtitles. 85 min. 

Asia, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 6/25 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have 72 hours to watch it.  

http://vimeo.com/ondemand/asiacleveland

Can You Bring It: Bill T. Jones and D-Man in the Waters

USA | 2020 | Tom Hurwitz, Rosalynde LeBlanc

This lyrical new documentary employs interviews and archival material to trace the history and legacy of one of the most important works of art to come out of the age of AIDS—Bill T. Jones' tour de force ballet "D-Man in the Waters." This 1989 work gave physical expression to the fear, anger, grief, and hope for salvation felt by the emerging Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Company as they were embattled by the AIDS pandemic. In the film, a group of young dancers reconstructs the dance, learning about this oft forgotten history and deepening their understanding of the power of art in a time of plague. “Dachra delivers its unsavory thrills.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. 94 min.

Can You Bring It: Bill T. Jones and D-Man in the Waters, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/16 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have five days to watch it.

https://kinomarquee.com/film/can-you-bring-it-bill-t-jones-and-d-man-in-the-waters/60c8ef25aae6880001e81f0b/cleveland-cinematheque

Chris Marker Centenary Salute

France | 1993–95 | Chris Marker

French filmmaker Chris Marker, whom The Guardian has called “the most poetic and original of documentarists,” was born 100 years ago on July 29. (He died in 2012.) To mark the occasion, we present three newly available short films of his and one popular short film collection. Program includes: Berliner Ballade (France, 1995), a tribute to Berlin filmed after the fall of the Wall; Blue Helmet (France, 1995), in which a United Nations peacekeeper recounts his experiences in Bosnia; Prime Time in the Camps (France, 1993), in which Bosnian refugees in Slovenia hijack and doctor major news channels’ satellite transmissions to create their own TV program; and Chris Marker’s Bestiary (France, 1994), a popular collection of five shorts about cats, owls, an elephant, et al. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 99 min.      

Chris Marker Centenary Salute, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/23 thru at least 8/12 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $10 and you have 72 hours to watch it. 

https://vimeo.com/ondemand/chrismarkerprogram

Dachra

Tunisia | 2018 | Abdelhamid Bouchnak

When did you last see an Arabic-language horror film? In this creepy North African chiller, three bumbling journalism students interview a dangerous madwoman at a local asylum. They decide to investigate the mysterious, traumatic incident that got her institutionalized over 20 years ago, which leads them to a remote, eerie village full of goats, strange women, and sinister children. “Dachra delivers its unsavory thrills.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 114 min.

Dachra, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/9 thru at least 7/29 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $10 and you have 72 hours to watch it.

http://watch.eventive.org/dachra/play/60de271f4beb2e00849adbab

Hanagatami

Japan | 2017 | Nobuhiko Obayashi

The late Japanese filmmaker Nobuhiko Obayashi (1938-2020) wanted to make this anti-war epic even before he directed his first feature, the cult classic House (Hausu), in 1977! He finally realized it at age 80, after being diagnosed with stage four lung cancer and given six months to live. Based on a 1937 novella by Kazuo Dan and set in a Japanese coastal village a few months before Pearl Harbor, the film focuses on a teenage boy whose friendships and romances with classmates, and whose thoughts about the future, are soon subsumed by the war. Like HausuHanagatami (the title means The Flower Basket) is an extravagantly stylized phantasmagoria that employs theatrical sets and lighting, rear projections, fake-looking CGI, and dizzying editing. But the experimentation is all in service to a wrenching lament for a lost generation. 100% critics rating (and audience score) on Rotten Tomatoes (as of 6/11). “Deeply felt and quite moving.” –Hollywood Reporter. “An auteurist fever dream.” –Village Voice. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 169 min.

Hanagatami, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/16 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $10 and you have 72 hours to watch it.

http://kimstimvirtual.vhx.tv/products/hanagatami-cia

Her Socialist Smile

USA | 2020 | John Gianvito

The radical views of author, lecturer, and crusader Helen Keller (who could neither see nor hear) have been largely suppressed or sanitized over the years. A pioneering leftist thinker who fervently and eloquently advocated for many progressive causes (from the rights of women and the disabled to international socialism and world peace), Keller is restored to her rightful place in American political discourse in this new film essay by John Gianvito (Profit Motive and the Whispering Wind). Gianvito combines onscreen text taken from Keller's speeches with images of nature and voiceover by poet Carolyn Forché to create a unique blend of activism, historical analysis, and poetry. With Noam Chomsky. "Reconstructs Keller from an icon of vague, feel-good platitudes to the fiercely political woman she truly was." —Hyperallergic. Cleveland premiere. 93 min.

Her Socialist Smile, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/16 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have five days to watch it. An "Audio Description Version" of the film is also available at the link below.

https://projectr.tv/films/her-socialist-smile/60c7e3b58c00eb0001561438?theater_id=190

Lourdes

France | 2019 | Thierry Demaizière, Alban Teulai

This acclaimed new documentary offers an immersive, behind-the-scenes look at the stunningly beautiful French mountain village that went from sleepy town to sacred wonder after a 14-year-old peasant girl in 1858 claimed to have seen the Virgin Mary in a remote grotto. Today Lourdes is second only to Paris in the number of annual visitors (6 million). Hopeful and faithful individuals from all over—including many that are sick or desperate—make pilgrimages there in search of a miracle. “Deeply moving.” –Hollywood Reporter. (NOTE: This film should not be confused with Jessica Hausner’s 2009 masterpiece of the same title.) Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 92 min. 

Lourdes, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 6/25 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $10 and you have 72 hours to watch it. 

https://distribfilmsusvirtual.vhx.tv/products/lourdes-cleveland-cinematheque

Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation

USA | 2020 | Lisa Immordino Vreeland

This dual biography of two of the 20th century’s greatest writers—Truman Capote and Tennessee Williams, both gay Southerners—spans their early friendship to their final withering critiques of each other. In between, these two men lived parallel lives of creativity and success, countered by self-doubt and addiction. The film contains ample archival material, including dishy talk show appearances and choice clips from movies adapted from their works—A Streetcar Named DesireThe Glass MenagerieBreakfast at Tiffany’sIn Cold Blood, et al. Voiceovers by Jim Parsons (Capote) and Zachary Quinto (Williams). “A fascinating account of a loving but troubled relationship.” –Hollywood Reporter. Cleveland premiere. 86 min. Photos courtesy of Getty Images (Capote) and Harry Ransom Center (Williams).  

Truman & Tennessee: An Intimate Conversation, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 6/18 thru at least 7/29 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have five days to watch it.  

https://kinomarquee.com/film/truman-tennessee-an-intimate-conversation/604a50eb4ea599000147d83c/cleveland-cinematheque 

Who Gets to Call it Art?

USA | 2006 | Peter Rosen

This snapshot of the 1960s downtown New York art scene focuses on the influential Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Henry Geldzahler, who in 1970 assembled a mammoth exhibition of post-1940 painting and sculpture by living NYC artists. In doing so, he got to call the work of Mark Di Suvero, Helen Frankenthaler, Jasper Johns, Claes Oldenberg, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Mark Rothko, Roy Lichtenstein, George Segal, Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, and many others “art.” The movie is a lively collage of archival footage and contemporary interviews with many of these legends. “One of the greatest art documentaries ever made.” –Film Threat. Cleveland revival premiere. 78 min.  

Who Gets To Call It Art?, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 6/18 thru at least 7/29 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have 30 days to watch it.  

https://watch.eventive.org/wgtcia/play/60bfe1b2229e17003e371937 

Witches of the Orient

France | 2021 | Julien Faraut

As a warm-up to this year's Tokyo Olympics, we look back to 1964, the last time the summer games were held in Tokyo. This new sports documentary from the director of John McEnroe: In the Realm of Perfection chronicles the thrilling rise of Japan’s 1964 women's volleyball team—a group of humble factory workers who became the pride of their nation with an unbelievable 258-game winning streak culminating in Olympic gold. Disparaged by some as "oriental witches," these women (and their punishing, perfectionist coach) remained tight and tough, and their triumph helped to establish postwar Japan as not just an "alien" upstart nation but a cultural and economic force to be reckoned with. Includes animé sequences, archival footage, and testimony by surviving team members. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 100 min.

Witches of the Orient, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/16 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have 72 hours to watch it.

https://kimstimvirtual.vhx.tv/products/the-witches-of-the-orient-cia

The Woman Who Ran

South Korea | 2020 | Hong Sang-soo

The 24th film in 24 years by prolific S. Korean master Hong Sang-soo is a female-centric, three-part comedy-drama in which a young florist (Hong’s current partner and muse Kim Min-hee) visits separately with three women friends while her husband is away on business—the first time they’ve been separated in five years of marriage. Though her three reunions—with a divorcee who now raises chickens, a pilates instructor, and a manager of an art house movie theater—are pretty talky and uneventful (usual with Hong), there’s more going on beneath the film’s placid surface than meets the eyes and ears. 100% critics rating on Rotten Tomatoes. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 77 min. 

The Woman Who Ran, a Cinematheque streaming exclusive, can be viewed online from 7/16 thru at least 8/5 via the link below. Doing so supports the Cinematheque. Screening fee is $12 and you have 72 hours to watch it.

https://cinemaguild.vhx.tv/checkout/the-woman-who-ran-cleveland-cinematheque/purchase

 


 Streaming questions or problems?

Email cinema@cia.edu or call 216.421.7450.

Cinematheque

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at the Cleveland Institute of Art
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216.421.7450
[contact]

Streaming questions or problems?

Email cinema@cia.edu or call 216.421.7450 

Columbus filmmakers explore Muslim-American community

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In cyberspace, no one will fear you stream.

Yes, we’ve relaxed our stringent presentation standards during our current coronavirus quarantine and closure. Though we still believe that movies are properly seen only in theaters (especially true in the case of the great, unusual, and special ones that the Cinematheque shows), we also believe that moviegoers should not have to jeopardize their health to view them that way.

That’s why we’ve teamed up with a number of our longtime film suppliers to allow temporary streaming of their movies on a unique revenue-sharing basis. When you rent one of the films listed on this page (accessing it through the Cleveland Cinematheque link), the fee you pay will be split between us and the film company. (The money is much needed on both ends). This arrangement allows distributors to keep releasing new films and restored classics to art houses like the Cinematheque while the nation’s theatrical exhibition network is offline.

We know that watching films at home is not the same as watching them on the big screen, with big sound, in our Peter B. Lewis Theater. But don’t feel guilty about compromising your own standards. You’re supporting us by streaming these movies, so we forgive you for aligning yourself right now with “the competition,” at-home viewing. (To be honest, we’re paying to watch these same films—and dealing with the same intermittent technical issues—from our own homes during this time.) We can all resume being cinema purists when this crisis is over.

Just don’t become too enamored of watching art films from your couch. We want you to return to the Cinematheque after the COVID-19 cloud passes. So go ahead and frequent our online multiplex and enjoy “virtual cinema” as often as you can. But always remember that “virtual” is the operative word. With your help, we will resume showing real movies in a real theater (where they will look, sound, and play the way they should) when this crisis subsides.

—John Ewing, Cinematheque Director

Cuyahoga Arts and Culture

Cleveland Institute of Art's public programming is supported in part by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.



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