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Exhibitions

Academics . Courses

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Senior Studio: BFA Research

Course No. PTG 421M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper | Michael Meier

Required for all 4th year Painting majors and open as an elective to any senor-level student with a prerequisite of Intro to Painting or permission of the instructor or Painting Chair. This course focuses on developing the student’s individual work as it relates to their subject and their means of making work. Emphasis will be on the strategies for constructing the meaning of the work in terms of materials and the way the work is read by a viewer. Students will read work, develop and discuss intention through critiques and discourse. The goal is to develop an understanding of the criteria, standards and values promoted by the artist and how these come to be understood by their audience by exploring the relationship between subject, form, material and process as they relate to content. Offered fall.

Serious Game Design: Theory + Applications

Course No. BMA 308-408  Credits: 3.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of serious or educational game development. The course materials and projects will help students understand how and why games can be used for learning in the fields of health, medicine, science and games for social change. The course exposes students to examples of the current work and research in game design mechanics, game learning mechanics, and assessment mechanics, which are integral to development of successful educational games. Students will be exposed to industry-specific serious games (games for learning, corporate training, news games, games for health, science, exer·games, military games, and games for social change). These examples along with specific lecture topics and materials will allow the student to understand how to develop their own serious game projects by learning specific research methods for understanding content, players and engagement strategies.

Serious Game Design: Theory + Applications

Course No. GAME 408  Credits: 3.0

This course introduces the fundamentals of serious or educational game development. The course materials and projects will help students understand how and why games can be used for learning in the fields of health, medicine, science and games for social change. The course exposes students to examples of the current work and research in game design mechanics, game learning mechanics and assessment mechanics; which are integral to development of successful educational games. Students will be exposed to industry-specific serious games (games for learning, corporate training, news games, games for health, science, exer-games, military games, and games for social change.) These examples along with specific lecture topics and materials, will allow the student to understand how to develop their own serious game projects by learning specific research methods for understanding content, players and engagement strategies.

Sewing + Fabrication

Course No. SEM 268-368-468  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara | Jimmy Kuehnle

This is a sewing and patternmaking class. The class will emphasize skills in machine sewing and related systems for fabrication using flexible materials. Constructing a garment will be the first project. Understanding the construction of a shirt and acquiring skills to assemble it is an ideal way to acquire hands-on skills and also to understand the shape of a surface or skin of any volumetric form. The class will then move on to patternmaking and the techniques of expanding, adding to, subtracting from, and morphing an existing pattern. These processes can then be used for constructing skins or shell structures for sculpture, clothing or costume. The emphasis will be on skills and practical information supplemented by images taken from the worlds of fashion, costume design, performance, and sculpture.

Silkscreen

Course No. PRI 270-370-470  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jessica Pinsky

Students will investigate surface, mark, and materiality from both a technical and conceptual point of view. The silkscreen can accept a wide variety of printing substances (pigments, inks, dyes, mud, talc, honey, etc), and can be applied to an equally diverse range of surfaces. Lectures, readings, and critiques will help students understand the historical role of screenprint and how it relates to their own work. Open Elective for all students above the Foundation level.

Silkscreen

Course No. VAT 270-370-470  Credits: 3.0

Students will investigate surface, mark, and materiality from both a technical and conceptual point of view. The silkscreen can accept a wide variety of printing substances (pigments, inks, dyes, mud, talc, honey, etc), and can be applied to an equally diverse range of surfaces. Lectures, readings, and critiques will help students understand the historical role of screenprint and how it relates to their own work. Open elective for all students above the Foundation level.

Social Cinemas: Politics of Representation and Engagement

Course No. HCS 322  Credits: 3.0

Social is a term used to describe all kinds of art and media today including social media, social practice, and activist media directed toward “social change.” This course examines film and video work that demands we think carefully about how the social is defined and represented as an idea, an experience, and a world (or worlds). We will begin by considering Jean Vigo’s call for a new “social cinema” in the 1930s. We’ll consider how experimental and avant-garde film functioned as a means for organizing social worlds and expressing social critique. We’ll ask what Stan VanDerBeek might have meant when he described the rise of a “new social media consciousness” in 1974. And finally we’ll look at how contemporary filmmakers and video artists respond to the way the Internet has changed our relationships to one another and to the events that shape our sense of how the larger social world is structured and defined. May be applied as an art history elective, Post-1960s art history elective, or humanities/cultural studies elective. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Socially Engaged Arts for Change

Course No. EP 200X-201X /300X-301X /400X-  Credits: 3.0

These year-long field-based practicums (1.5 cr. per semester) provide interested, eligible students from all majors an opportunity to engage with classmates in community-based and real-world projects, developing their social agency, while advancing their experience in the field of “social practice” in art and design. Each section of “SEA Change” is developed in advance by a faculty member in collaboration with community organizations, other institutions, and/or grass-roots partners, and is centered on a particular theme for a year-long project. Practicums are located in diverse social and physical contexts, all requiring meaningful, reciprocal interaction with a community of interest. Emphasized are practice and expansion of student’s existing art, design, interpersonal, and project management skills, while engaging with a community of interest in a positive mutual exchange. Students spend 2–4 hours per week on-site, working on the project under faculty or site supervision, meet periodically in seminar on campus, and maintain a reflection blog/portfolio. Students responsible for their own transportation. Open studio elective. 1.5 credits per semester. Fall and spring enrollment required for 3 credits.

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