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projectFIND: displaced + locate

Course No. EP 200X.02-201X.02 EP300X.02-3  Credits: 3.0

As artists and designers, how do we engage complex social issues? Under the direction of a faculty member, this year-long, field-based practicum (1.5 cr. per semester) engages student artists and designers with community partners and individuals exploring and addressing the issues of displaced people, while responding creatively and critically through the lens of placemaking. Students spend 2-3 hours per week in the field working to understand the experience and context of displaced people and the organizations that serve this population. With those experiences and understandings of the context, students are then expected to produce work of various types, scales and at various locations. Student projects are shaped and calibrated by factors such as students’ creative interests, art and design skills, and own perspectives, as well as by the community partners’ input and collaboration. Student schedules will be customized in concert with the instructor. Students will also meet periodically in seminar on campus, and maintain a reflection blog/portfolio. Students responsible for their own transportation. Open studio elective. Prerequisite: conversation with instructor. 1.5 credits per semester. Fall and Spring enrollment required for 3 credits.

Propaganda: Media, Dissemination, Technique

Course No. PRI 240-340-440  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Maggie Denk-Leigh

From punk bands to political rallies, different techniques have been used to create attention- grabbing graphics. Through a variety of projects in this course, students will explore a range of techniques including approaches to screen-printing from simple stencil making methods; direct drawing on the screens; to a variety of ways to use photo emulsion, including the integration of digital imaging software. The emphasis of this class is the development of rich personal imagery and the relationship of form working with content to effectively communicate ideas. This course is for students from all levels and majors. Notes: Open Elective. Encouraged for Third/Fourth year students as an Elective Studio. Required for fourth-year Print Majors.

Publication Design

Course No. GDS 35X-45X  Credits: 3.0

This course covers contemporary issues in Publication Design. The aesthetic of type and image remains the most widespread media for graphic designers. Aspects of the printed word and image will be investigated and considered in this class by focusing on the process by which ideas are developed, conceived, written, edited, and ultimately presented. Publication Design will explore projects that will include exercises focused on working within a team, within budgets, with other professionals, and with key vendors. The sequence of the idea is stressed, including how these ideas are presented and revealed through a variety of publishing media.

Publication Photography

Course No. PHV 229-329-429  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Nancy McEntee
Prerequisite(s) Photo 1: Introduction to Photography | Fundamentals of Studio Lighting (EP)

This course introduces students to careers as photographers in the advertising and editorial fields. Students will learn approaches for meeting the expectations of art directors and photo editors while providing creative input of their own. Emphasis is placed on networking, negotiating, understanding and producing contracts and invoices, as well as building a professional portfolio and developing professional marketing strategies. Field trips will be taken to professional photography studios and businesses. Assignments are designed to simulate practical work experiences. Open elective. Prerequisites: PHV 295 Photo I: Intro to Photography; PHV 292 Fundamentals of Studio Lighting, or Instructor signature.




Putting Artists in the Classroom

Course No. EP 400  Credits: 3.0

Students will have the opportunity to receive a general introduction to the world of art education. Students will have the opportunity to give back to their community by providing art education to a school that does not have an existing art program. Students will be working with a cooperating classroom teacher in order to have first-hand teaching experience through the creation of the studio arts. Through this process students will be provided with the principles and practices of art education for grades K-8. Students will also be provided with curriculum construction and lesson planning to be used during their teaching of art education.

Putting Artists in the Classroom: Intro to Teaching Art

Course No. GEN 400-400A  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kristin Thompson-Smith

Students will have the opportunity to receive a general introduction to the world of art education. Students will have the opportunity to give back to their community by providing art education to a school that does not have an existing art program. Students will be working with a cooperating classroom teacher in order to have first-hand teaching experience through the creation of the studio arts. Through this process students will be provided with the principles and practices of art education for grades K-8. Students will also be provided with curriculum construction and lesson planning to be used during their teaching of art education. Offered fall and spring.

Race and Representation in Contemporary Art + Culture

Course No. ACD 420  Credits: 3.0
Faculty David Hart

This seminar-style course considers the relationship between race and representation in visual art and culture during the last three decades using contemporary methods including multi-culturism and postcolonial theory. We will discuss and analyze examples of contemporary art as well as popular culture drawn from advertisements, animation, film, the internet, installation and performance art, sculpture, photography, television and video. The focus will be on American culture, but discussions will also include the cultural contexts of Africa, the Caribbean, Europe, and Latin America. In addition to the primary focus on the representation of race, questions of class, sexuality, and gender will also be considered. Questions to be addressed include: Is race largely a biological or cultural phenomenon? How are "white" and "mixed-race" understood as racial categories? How have artists of different races dealt with racial identity and representation? Do popular media such as commercial advertisements and music videos convey prevailing notions of racial stereotypes? Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Retail Design + Brand Design (EP)

Course No. INTA 332  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Michael Gollini | Patrick Finegan
Prerequisite(s) Retail, Restaurant + Store Design | INTA: Intermediate Problems (EP)

Course includes brand-focused projects including a retail design project hosted at client location with the final presentation to their design team and an advance design problem with industry interaction or competition with a potential summer internship. Mandatory for all junior Interior Design majors. Open elective, sophomore and above. Prerequisite for Interior Architecture majors: INTA232A and INTA331. No prerequisites for electives. Offered spring.

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Portals_Thresholds

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