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Printmaking

Academics . Printmaking . Courses

Printmaking Courses

Aesthetics, Style + Content

Course No. VAT 300  Credits: 3.0

Aesthetics Style and Content focuses primarily, on the acquisition of creative and technical skills in the context of the development of original ideas and personal style. Studio work will consist of the practical exploration of the relationship between formal, technical, aesthetic, and stylistic issues relative to the personal, and thematic subjects of the students own choosing. Relative to this, in the seminar portion of the course the students are given critical, theoretical, philosophical background to issues surrounding the subjects of style, aesthetics and content. In the studio the students are encouraged to think of their work as an integrative whole consisting of these various components. In this context they are required to engage in independent critical research on topics relevant to their work. Their research takes the form of both archival and studio work and is presented in both visual and written form. This course is required for all senior students in Visual Arts. Offered fall.

Artist's Book Now: Artist's Book as Image

Course No. PRI 231-331-431  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kyle Holland

This studio course focuses on boundaries of book form, emphasis on image and concept, and selection of appropriate form (output) to content. Students will be encouraged to view the book as a conceptual space. Deeper development of sequencing and narrative in traditional and nontraditional formats. Forms covered on individual project basis as dictated by idea/concept for appropriate output/manifestation. Considerations include sculptural, installation, digital output, etc. Examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library's artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Notes: This course is open to all, and fulfills an introductory, intermediate and advanced level elective course.

Artist's Book: Narrative + Form

Course No. PRI 232-332-432  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kyle Holland

This course is for students interested in producing sequentially developed imagery via linear book structures. Historical examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library’s artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Due to technological advancements over the last century artists now have a variety of media with which to explore output of book projects. The class will expose students to the nature and potential of different book structures as well as a variety of materials. The course will heighten the student’s ability to utilize the interaction of sequenced content—the act of turning pages—to express the continuity of an idea flowing through a continuum. Students realize the potential of narrative, sequence, and pacing, together with the importance of combining word and image. Open elective. One semester required for Printmaking majors for graduation.

BFA Statement + Exhibition

Course No. VAT 493  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper | Sarah Kabot

This course is meant to supplement the work done in the student’s major studio classes. It focuses on preparing the BFA candidate for their exhibition, BFA Thesis Paper, Short Artist’s Statement and BFA Thesis Examination. The BFA Review process is comprised of four components:

  • Documentation
  • Exhibition
  • BFA Thesis Paper and Short Artist’s Statement (Abstract)
  • BFA Thesis Examination (Oral Defense/Review).
As part of the course, these requirements will be reviewed in technical terms as well as in the context of professional practices in general.

The BFA thesis paper is meant to prepare the student for their BFA thesis examination and to provide the foundation for professional practices beyond graduation. It is an opportunity for an in-depth consideration of work and studio practice. Within the paper and among other questions, students are expected to address: “What is the work? What is the reasonable expectation for how it will be received by a given audience? What is the work’s historical and contemporary context? What are the sources for the work? What choices were made in realizing the work and how do they contribute to the reception of the work?” This course is open to all seniors regardless of major but is required by all Visual Arts seniors. Offered spring.

Collage + Assemblage

Course No. VAT 212  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Ingrisano

Collage and Assemblage are among the most radical innovations of the early 20th century and these forms remain relevant today as sources for innovation and experimentation. Each of these forms acknowledges the fracture of contemporary life and the ongoing need for new means of expression. This course will explore the relationship between collage and assemblage and various disciplines within the visual arts including Painting, Print, and Drawing. Students will learn to discern the significantly different effects and content of the wide range of strategies these approaches encompass. Through classroom discussion, lectures, readings, critiques and studio work students will explore the possibilities available through collage and assemblage. Emphasis will be given to the historical and contemporary studio practices associated with collage and assemblage. This course is open to all students from all majors. Students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to the studio work.

Critical Issues in Art in Theory + Practice

Course No. VAT 316  Credits: 3.0

This class will focus on how the relationship between the visual and the verbal, images, and ideas play out in artist’s work. Emphasis will be placed on artist statements, writings by artists, student peer reviews, and written statements. Students will be expected to hone their abilities to think critically about visual art through weekly readings and writing assignments. This course is open to majors from all disciplines and students will be encouraged to work in their area of expertise.

Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 341  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Expanded Print: New Imaging

Course No. PRI 276-376-476  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kat Burdine

This intermediate/advanced studio course offers an exploration in printmaking, considering the digital matrix for computer aided and hand pulled prints through processes redefined in the digital age, scrutinizing decisions for information in and information out, and the relationship to those decisions. Students will be challenged to work in the territory of digital media in relationship to and combination with traditional print medium. Students have the opportunity to create files for output which are hand drawn, digitally generated, of a photographic nature, or a combination of all three. Topics include; transfer methods, digital production of plates, color management for a wide-format digital printer, photolithography and exploration of media choices to project ideas. Technical and critical discussion in this course will be informed by the presentation of processes that have been developed over the past few decades, and how these developments relate and affect print culture today. Open elective. Encouraged for juniors and seniors as an elective studio. Required for junior Printmaking majors.

Meet Your Faculty view all

Maggie Denk-Leigh marrydenk-leighart02.jpgcriticalcondition.december2008.2.jpg

Maggie Denk-Leigh

Associate Professor | Chair of Printmaking

Maggie is an Associate Professor and Printmaking Department Chair. She is a founding member and Board Presiden...more

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