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Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Art of China

Course No. ACD 465  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Heath Patten

The primary goal of this course is to explore the art and culture of China (including mainland China and Taiwan). Political, religious, social, and visual aspects of the art will be stressed in class. In order to understand Chinese art and civilization, we will look at art objects from terra-cotta pottery of the Neolithic period, bronze vessels, Buddhist murals and sculptures of the Tang era, literati paintings and imperial tastes of medieval China up to contemporary art. Subjects such as women artists and performing arts will be also discussed in this course. As the semester progresses, some additional readings may be assigned. Visual Culture Emphasis course. Formerly ACD 365.

Asian Art Survey

Course No. ACD 472  Credits: 3.0

This course serves as a "survey" or a window for the art of multiple cultures. This lecture/exercise/discussion-style course explores the art and visual culture of Asia, focusing on India, Japan and China. Political, religious, social, and visual aspects of art will be stressed in class. In order to understand the art and civilization of these three countries, we will look at art objects ranging from ancient archaeological finds, medieval architecture to modern and contemporary art. Subjects such as women artists, performing arts and animation will also be discussed in this course. The content of this course will be generally divided into pre-Modern, Modern, and Contemporary eras in which art and visual culture will be discussed with geographic perspectives. As the semester progresses, some additional readings and films may be assigned. Each student is encouraged to find examples learned in the course and apply them to his/her intellectual development. Visual Culture Emphasis course. Formerly ACD 372.

Art of East Asia

Course No. ACD 473  Credits: 3.0

This lecture/discussion-style course is to explore the art and visual culture of East Asia, focusing on Japan and China. Political, religious, social, and visual aspects of the art will be stressed in class. In order to understand art and civilization of these two countries, we will look at art objects from ancient archeological objects, medieval architecture, to modern and contemporary art. Subjects such as women artists, performing arts and animation will be also discussed in this course. Visual Culture Emphasis course. Fulfills non-Western art history requirement. Formerly ACD 373X.

India: Culture + Society

Course No. ACD 480 / SNS 380  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Heath Patten

Once the jewel in the crown of the British Empire, India has some 5,000 years of artistic tradition and architectural heritage. This course focuses on the essential role of the visual in India's ancient and modern cultural and religious traditions. The creation and nature of visual imagery are explored in sculpture, temples, palaces, persons, symbols, times and places. From bustling cities to remote villages and pilgrimage sites, from beggar to Brahmin to Hindu gods and goddesses, the course explores the "divine image" in India. Fulfills Non-Western Art History requirement. Formerly ACD 380X / SNS 380.

Japanese Visual Culture: Where Modernity Meets Tradition

Course No. ACD 485  Credits: 3.0

This course will explore all aspects of Japan’s visual culture, island by island, theme by theme. Special attention will be devoted to Japan’s major cities, and the most important cultural sites, including temples, shrines, gardens, and parks. We will discuss the history of Japan, traditional Japanese culture, and current Japanese pop culture. Student assignments will focus on the history of Japanese illustration, including ukiyo-e, manga, and anime. The course lectures will introduce these topics, as well as present an examination of all traditional Japanese art forms, from temple architecture to the tea ceremony. Formerly ACD 386X.

Putting Artists in the Classroom: Intro to Teaching Art

Course No. GEN 400-400A  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kristin Thompson-Smith

Students will have the opportunity to receive a general introduction to the world of art education. Students will have the opportunity to give back to their community by providing art education to a school that does not have an existing art program. Students will be working with a cooperating classroom teacher in order to have first-hand teaching experience through the creation of the studio arts. Through this process students will be provided with the principles and practices of art education for grades K-8. Students will also be provided with curriculum construction and lesson planning to be used during their teaching of art education. Offered fall and spring.

BFA Thesis Continuation

Course No. GEN 490  Credits: 0.0

Option for students who have completed all course requirements but who require an additional semester to complete their BFA thesis exhibition. Permission of the major department chair required. $500 studio access fee charged.

Artistically Speaking: How to Speak for your Art

Course No. HCS 300  Credits: 3.0

This interdisciplinary course explores the ground from which, in the Chinese Taoist philosophic view, all great creativity springs. The purpose is two-fold: first, to investigate and achieve an understanding of the Taoist world view through readings of primary texts such as the "Tao Te Ching" and the "Chuangtzu," and selected works from the Ch'an (Zen) tradition. Second, we proceed to examine the Taoist and Ch'an perceptions are applied to and affect the creation of the art object in traditional China, primarily represented by selections from Chinese poetry. Appropriate attention will also be paid to intended relationships between painting and poetry, occurring when poems are inscribed directly on paintings to create an aesthetic whole. Here the notion that "visual" and "literary" experiences are somehow mutually exclusive will be challenged. We read such poets as T'so Ch'ien, Wang Wei, Su Tung-p'o and Han Shan, and we look at paintings by such artists as Mu Ch'i, Mi Fei, Shih T'ao and Ni Tsan. Students are encouraged to connect and contrast Taoist assumptions and themes with their own knowledge and experiences as developing artists. May be applied as Creative Writing Concentration course.

Meet Your Faculty view all

Scott Lax tyttdvd-680.jpgimg37762.jpg

Scott Lax

Lecturer

Scott Lax is a Lecturer in Creative Writing at the Cleveland Institute of Art. His first novel, The Year That ...more

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