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Jewelry + Metals

Academics . Jewelry + Metals . Courses

Jewelry + Metals Courses

Jewelry + Metals: Ceremony + Ritual

Course No. MET 261-361-461  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz

Consider the importance of the objects we use in specialized events, ceremonies, and our daily rituals. How does ceremony and ritual fit into the context of the 21st century and our society? We explore historic and worldwide references to ceremonial and ritual objects through the slide presentations, videos, and actual works. Students create objects based on individual exploration and interest relevant to the subject. Additional independent work is also required. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Color

Course No. MET 260-360-460  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss | Kathy Buszkiewicz | Matthew Hollern

The use of color in jewelry and metals presents great possibilities. This course will explore a range of approaches to the use of color and colored materials in the creation of jewelry, functional objects, and small sculpture. Beyond the classic greens and browns, we will develop and apply chemical patinas to produce a range of effects in colors and patterns. In aluminum, the electro-chemical process of anodization will allow pigment dyes to be deposited in the surface of the metal. Plastics will be presented to allow for fabrication with stock materials, casting of resins and polymers, and laminations. Other pigments such as colored-pencils, paints, and powder coating are also addressed. Extensive samples and slides supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Fabrication

Course No. MET 206-306-406  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Jewelry + Metals

Emphasis in the studio is placed on fabrication techniques, from pattern work to cold connection, soldering on larger scale and hollow construction. Independent work is encouraged. Visiting artists, field trips, and slide presentations supplement the class. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives. Prerequisites: MET249 Introduction to Jewelry + Metals.

Jewelry + Metals: Flatware

Course No. MET 266-366-466  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Jewelry + Metals

Flatware is an exploration of utensils for preparing, serving, and eating food. Emphasis is placed on function, related concepts, and use of materials. Independent work is also encouraged. This is an intermediate and advanced level course designed to challenge students’ conceptual and design skills. The exploration of advanced studio processes will be encouraged to help facilitate the projects’ design and fabrication. Problems are presented to challenge all levels of students. Visiting artists, field trips, and slide presentations supplement the class. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives. Prerequisites: MET249 Introduction to Jewelry + Metals.

Jewelry + Metals: Forming + Fabrication

Course No. MET 259-359-459  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

This course is designed to develop skills in forming nonferrous metal through the various metalsmithing processes of raising, stretching, seaming, snarling, crimping, and pitch work used to create volumetric forms for functional and nonfunctional objects as well as jewelry. Problems are presented to challenge all levels of students, recognize the direction of the group and include singular object-driven problems, along with discussion of formal and conceptual issues. Presentations, visiting artists, slides, and actual objects supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Internship (EP)

Course No. MET 399-499  Credits: 3.0

Majors are encouraged to have an internship in the jewelry, metals, and related fields. They may carry up to 3 elective credits. Majors have interned with Liz Claiborne, Juicy Couture, Kraftmaid, Nine West, Albert Paley Studios, Thomas Mann, Heather B. Moore, and others. Available to junior Jewelry + Metals majors. Fulfills Engaged Practice requirement.

Jewelry + Metals: Jewelry Concepts

Course No. MET 254-354-454  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz

Why is jewelry worn? How is jewelry worn? This course will focus on the motivations behind why we make jewelry, and how jewelry functions in our contemporary culture, and others. The question of the boundaries of what defines jewelry, and the exploration of concepts guide the work. Self-initiated projects, as well as assignments relating to jewelry concepts, are presented throughout the semester. Readings, research, and dialogue are an integral part of the class. Slides and actual contemporary and historic pieces supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Mechanisms

Course No. MET 251-351-451  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz | Matthew Hollern
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Jewelry + Metals

Throughout the history of jewelry and metalwork mechanisms have served physical, aesthetic, and conceptual functions, from movement to closure, ornament to interaction. This course is designed as a project-based curriculum to offer experiences to learn to design and make mechanisms, catches, latches, and hinges for movement and closure of jewelry and objects, as well as linkage systems, findings for jewelry, and mechanical objects. Each student has the opportunity to complete technical exercises, samples, and finished work for your portfolio. Slides, demonstrations and samples supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives. Prerequisite: MET249 Introduction to Jewelry + Metals.



Meet Your Faculty view all

Kathy Buszkiewicz slip-knot180x7.6x12.jpgslip-knot-detail-1.jpg

Kathy Buszkiewicz

Professor

As a materials magician, Kathy Buszkiewicz creates multi-layered works from U.S. currency which explore themes...more

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