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Weaving Patterns: Collective Activity

Course No. SEM 275-375-475  Credits: 3.0
Faculty William Lorton

Students will learn to weave and explore the possibilities of the process on traditional floor looms (floor, tapestry, computer-assisted Dobby) and alternative weaving devices (constructed from found objects or using architectural influences). Technical vocabulary and conceptual focus will be developed through an investigation of process, material, tools, and the many and varied histories of weaving. The intersection between weaving and collaboration will be explored in discussions on the development of pattern/structure as a form of communication; looms built in situ; implication of globalization on craft production; traditional and contemporary practice of gifting; and social participation.

Web Design/Interactive I & II

Course No. GDS 305-305B  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Design for Communication I (EP)

Through this course, students will learn how to use different software tools to design, implement, and produce a Graphic User Interface. Our efforts will be mostly concentrated on creating web/internet/interactive projects, as these will allow for the exercise of ideas and tools across the entire design spectrum. Students will have a grasp of the essential technology used for web applications: the Hyper-Text Markup Language (including HTML 5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). You will be introduced to several techniques that will allow you to begin making interactive applications, which include PHP, JQuery and Javascript, as well as looking at user experience and design of apps for smart phone and tablets. The course will also include an introduction to designing and creating Epub formats. Prerequisite: GDS265 Design for Communication I or permission of instructor. Offered fall.

Wheel Throwing: Beginning + Advanced

Course No. SEM 271-371-471  Credits: 3.0
Faculty William Lorton

In this class students will learn to design repeat patterns and structures for weaving, printing, and other digitally controlled output systems. Participants will be introduced to methods of analog and digital repeat generation while gaining fluency in ProWeave, and furthering their knowledge of Illustrator and Photoshop. Arrangements with affiliated institutions will allow students to have their designs digitally printed, die-cut, or industrially woven, expanding the opportunity for fulfillment of their concepts on a scale and complexity previously unrealized. Classroom discussion will examine the impact of historical, cultural, industrial, and contemporary factors on pattern design. No prerequisites.

Woman's Words

Course No. LLC 424  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Joyce Kessler

This course is designed to outline the contributions of women to the origins and development of the novel genre in English and American literature from 1688 to the present time. It will focus on discovery of the relationships between the earliest women's literary production and the literature written by the women of this moment. It will inquire into the areas of race and social class as they are directly relevant to (or feature as tropes within) the literature comprising our reading list. It also introduces some of the basic theoretical questions that feminist scholarship has raised in connection with women's writing during these periods. Through selected readings, research, and critical discussion, members of this class will become familiar with modern women's literature, its social/historical contexts, and some of the feminist critical approaches through which it has been considered. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Working Collaboratively + Group Dynamics

Course No. VAT 354-454  Credits: 3.0

Though the image of the artist is that of the solitary individual striving to express their vision Ð the contemporary practice of art is peppered with numerous examples of artists collaborating. This course will focus on how the presentations of images, and objects have been effected by changing social and cultural perspectives and the technologies of reproduction. These extend form something as simple as organizing a group exhibition, to the type of social interventions practiced by the Guerrilla Girls or the work of such entities as Gilbert and George, or the collective N55. This course through projects, readings, and critiques will explore the dynamic of working collaboratively. Each exercise will address different processes, skill-sets and interpersonal relationships. Through classroom discussion, lectures, and studio assignments the social, historical, cultural, technological context that gave rise to the current practices of collage, assemblage and installation will be elaborated. This course is open to majors from all disciplines and students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to assignments and classroom readings and discussion. This course is open to students from all disciplines and is not media specific.

Working Collaboratively: Art + The Group Dynamic

Course No. PTG 25X-35X-45X  Credits: 3.0

Though the image of the artist is that of the solitary individual striving to express their vision Ð the contemporary practice of art is peppered with numerous examples of artists collaborating. These extend form something as simple as organizing a group exhibition, to the type of social interventions practiced by the Guerrilla Girls or the work of such entities as Gilbert and George, or the collective N55. This course through projects, readings, and critiques will explore the dynamic of working collaboratively. Each exercise will address different processes, skill-sets and interpersonal relationships. This course is open to students from all disciplines and is not media specific.

World Cinemas

Course No. HCS 374X  Credits: 3.0

Writing on film aesthetics in 1930, a year marked by global financial crisis and mounting political conflict, Béla Balázs did not feel it was possible to speak of the “people of the world.” But if that day were ever to arrive, he predicted, film would be there “ready and waiting to provide the universal spirit with its corresponding technique of expression.” Today we talk about how technology has altered the world, making it feel smaller and infinitely expanded at the same time. But can we still say film holds the promise of universal expression? If not, what does it promise now? What, in other words, do film’s techniques of expression correspond to in our contemporary world?

In this course, we will spend time looking carefully at cinematic technique in films produced all over the world during the course of the medium’s history. At the same time we will also look carefully at the ideas and fantasies that animate “world cinema” as a label for certain kind of films without taking for granted that this phrase always means or has meant the same thing. Why do some critics and theorists embrace this term while others find it inadequate, a bad fit, something in need of qualification or replacement? What corrections and critiques have these writers offered? How do their observations change the way we see film technique and our own unexamined assumptions about how film makes the world available to each of us as viewers? $25 course fee required. May be applied as Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Writing + Inquiry I: Basic Composition + Contemporary Ideas

Course No. LLC 101  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Magallanes Moody | Donald Modica | Jonathan Rosati | Joyce Kessler | Katherine Clark | Kevin Risner | Mark Bassett | Olatubosun Ogunsanwo

A composition-intensive course that emphasizes basic composition skills, while introducing basic research and documentation skills. Along with cultivating the concomitant skills in critical reading and thinking, this course also introduces an explicitly theoretical approach to contemporary culture. Twenty pages of student expository writing will be required. Offered fall.

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