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Drawing

Academics . Drawing . Courses

Drawing Courses

Installation + The Constructed Object

Course No. VAT 226  Credits: 3.0

This course is a special topic course designed to cover the design, construction and lighting of installations, stage sets, and performance spaces. Students will investigate contemporary applications and approaches to subjects specifically composed for the camera and document installations that exist outside of the studio environment, with an emphasis on the genre’s relationship to historical and contemporary theater. Workshops include cameras, studio lighting, basic electricity and carpentry, with an emphasis on scenery design. Students will plan and create small-scale models of stage designs; scale up these designs, and document their design. This course is designed for the Photography major and any students working in installation or industrial design but is open to all majors. This course is cross-listed with Visual Arts. Open Studio elective.

Screenprinting

Course No. VAT 270-370-470  Credits: 3.0

Students will investigate surface, mark, and materiality from both a technical and conceptual point of view. The silkscreen can accept a wide variety of printing substances (pigments, inks, dyes, mud, talc, honey, etcetera...), and can be applied to an equally diverse range of surfaces. Lectures, readings, and critiques will help students understand the historical role of screenprint and how it relates to their own work. Open elective for all students above the freshman level.

Hybrid Approaches to Drawing + Painting: Digital Media

Course No. VAT 327  Credits: 3.0

Emphasis is on integrating digital processes into studio practice and production. The class deals with a spectrum of digital applications in a studio practice including straightforward digital output, using digital technology as a means of producing source material as well as actually integrating digital processes into the production of work. Through slide presentations, viewing actual work, discussions, and readings, students will be introduced to the place of the digital in contemporary studio practice. In studio production, students will use varied media and subjects, both traditional and non-traditional, to further develop their analytical and expressive means in their creative practice. Students are encouraged to draw from many disciplines incorporating them in the projects presented to the class for group critiques. Open to all students; required of Printmaking and Drawing juniors. Offered fall.

Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 341  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Working Collaboratively + Group Dynamics

Course No. VAT 354-454  Credits: 3.0

Though the image of the artist is that of the solitary individual striving to express their vision Ð the contemporary practice of art is peppered with numerous examples of artists collaborating. This course will focus on how the presentations of images, and objects have been effected by changing social and cultural perspectives and the technologies of reproduction. These extend form something as simple as organizing a group exhibition, to the type of social interventions practiced by the Guerrilla Girls or the work of such entities as Gilbert and George, or the collective N55. This course through projects, readings, and critiques will explore the dynamic of working collaboratively. Each exercise will address different processes, skill-sets and interpersonal relationships. Through classroom discussion, lectures, and studio assignments the social, historical, cultural, technological context that gave rise to the current practices of collage, assemblage and installation will be elaborated. This course is open to majors from all disciplines and students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to assignments and classroom readings and discussion. This course is open to students from all disciplines and is not media specific.

Role of the Artist as Producer (EP)

Course No. VAT 400  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Jessica Pinsky

Contemporary artists have a multitude of ways they can engage with the larger world, beyond the realm of the gallery or museum. Students enrolled in this course will explore various models of artistic production including, but not limited to, performer, activist, curator and provocateur. The relationship between method of creation and idea, or the handmade versus the industrial, will be investigated. Additionally, assignments will challenge students to analyze the content of their artwork within local, national, and global contexts. Coursework will include studio work, readings, discussion, and critiques. Required for Visual Art juniors in all majors. Open as an elective with approval of instructor. Offered spring. Fulfills Engaged Practice requirement.

Performance Art

Course No. VAT 480  Credits: 3.0

Performance art is and has been an open genre, a place to experiment with ideas, materials and time. For this course, the working definition of “performance art” is – a piece which uses a live body, exists in time, and is non-linear. This class is an introduction to performance art, designed for students who are shy and apprehensive about performing, and students who are extroverted and at ease in front of groups. Workshops include: developing a language of movement, gesture, and stance; developing a range of low-tech sound, lighting and video; juxtaposing activity, image, sound and text; structuring or building a piece; and documentation. We will consider singular actions, interventions, and other strategies for generating and developing ideas for performance work. Student work for this class has been diverse and has included costume-based work, work using endurance as a central tactic, collaborative work, public intervention, interactive and site-specific work. Skills in editing video and sound, installation, animation are useful, but not required.

BFA Statement + Exhibition

Course No. VAT 493  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Lane Cooper

This course is meant to supplement the work done in the student’s major studio classes. It focuses on preparing the BFA candidate for their exhibition, BFA Thesis Paper, Short Artist’s Statement and BFA Thesis Examination. The BFA Review process is comprised of four components:

  • Documentation
  • Exhibition
  • BFA Thesis Paper and Short Artist’s Statement (Abstract)
  • BFA Thesis Examination (Oral Defense/Review).
As part of the course, these requirements will be reviewed in technical terms as well as in the context of professional practices in general.

The BFA thesis paper is meant to prepare the student for their BFA thesis examination and to provide the foundation for professional practices beyond graduation. It is an opportunity for an in-depth consideration of work and studio practice. Within the paper and among other questions, students are expected to address: “What is the work? What is the reasonable expectation for how it will be received by a given audience? What is the work’s historical and contemporary context? What are the sources for the work? What choices were made in realizing the work and how do they contribute to the reception of the work?” This course is open to all seniors regardless of major but is required by all Visual Arts seniors. Offered spring.

Meet Your Faculty view all

Amber Kempthorn

Amber Kempthorn

Lecturer

Amber Kempthorn explores memory and cultural mythology through drawing and collage. Her work is exhibited regi...more

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