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Cinematheque
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Jul 23, 2014

Professor's productive year saw exhibitions, acquisitions, residencies, travel, and press

View details 2014 Student Summer Show

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May 19, 2014

2014 Student Summer Show

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Jul 22, 2014

CIA grad's iconic monument to be rededicated

View details 60 Looney Tunes cartoons coming to the Cinematheque

events

Jul 05, 2014

60 Looney Tunes cartoons coming to the Cinematheque

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social

about 2 hours ago via Facebook

Assistant Professor Barry Underwood had a busy, productive sabbatical last year. He traveled to half a dozen national parks around the western U.S. to scout locations and take photographs for a new project; completed two artist residencies in New England; took part in nine exhibitions; was featured in more than a dozen magazine and website articles; and rounded out the year with four of his prints selected for Akron Art Museumís permanent photography collection. Read more in the article below.

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Jul 22, 2014

Thursday night concert series rocks CIA's neighborhood

View details 2014 Faculty Exhibition Opening Reception

cia exhibition

Aug 28, 2014

2014 Faculty Exhibition Opening Reception

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Jun 25, 2014

Cuyahoga County unveils county seal designed by CIA student

View details 2014 Faculty Exhibition

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Aug 28, 2014

2014 Faculty Exhibition

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Jul 29, 2014

7/31-8/2: Looney Tunes finale, The Double, Brasslands & more!

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Aug 20, 2013

CIA named one of the "Best in the Midwest"

View details Filmmaker and author John Waters to present one-man show

events

Sep 27, 2014

Filmmaker and author John Waters to present one-man show

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

TIME: Internshp

Course No. TIM399/499  Credits: 0.0

Elective credit can be given on a case-by- case basis for an internship developed by student through the career services office, with advance permission of instructor and head of department.

Topics in 20th-Century US History

Course No. HCS390X  Credits: 3.0

As the title suggests, this is an entry-level survey course in modern American history, covering the period roughly from the end of Reconstruction to the late 20th century. In this course we will follow a chronological continuum. We will emphasize political, economic, cultural and social history. We will look at those in positions of power and those groups in society trying to acquire rights and power. In 15 weeks, we will be progressing from the period of steam engines and the American frontier to rock ‘n’ roll and the Apollo moon landing — a vast amount of material. The choice of what to include and what to leave out is entirely subjective, and class feedback on those decisions is encouraged. Issues of international importance will be discussed, in some cases in depth, but the main emphasis of the course will be on the domestic transformation.

Topics in Environmental Science

Course No. SNS390X  Credits: 3.0

This course explores a broad range of topics that come under the heading of Environmental Science. It will focus on humans and the environment, taking in populations and health, earth resources, water management, food and hunger, biodiversity and sustainable living systems. Applications of these topics to various problems in design such as the design of sustainable cities will be emphasized through term research projects. Fulfills Social or Natural Science liberal arts distribution elective. No prerequisites.

Traditional Tribal Art

Course No. SNS357  Credits: 3.0

Specific cultures of sub-Saharan Africa are reviewed through their visual arts and ritual. The goal is to understand how each group's history and cultural context influence the creative process (use of symbols, style, media, and technique) and shape the aesthetic response. Some comparative materials from Oceania, India, and Some comparative materials from Oceania, India, and North America are also examined.

Transportation Design

Course No. IND235A/335A/435A  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Santarelli | D. Ed Covert | Haishan Deng

This is an introductory course exposing students to the basic knowledge, skills and qualities that are important for a career in transportation design. CIA faculty and practicing transportation designers will demonstrate methods for creating context, inspiring designs, ideation through sketching/ rendering and verbal and visual communication. Specific project themes will be driven by industry sponsors while deliverables will be determined by the individual aptitude and experience. Regular formal reviews will enable individuals to develop verbal and visual presentation skills, and formal lectures will be balanced against one-on-one in-studio instruction. Professional designers, both staff level and management, in addition to guests with specialized industry expertise will visit throughout the semester Offered fall.

Tribe vs. Nation

Course No. SNS479  Credits: 3.0

The course is an anthropological examination of the impact of technology and "western" industrial development on indigenous populations worldwide. Assumptions posed in the concepts "progress" and "development" are examined by in-depth review of traditional society and culture change among, for instance, the Balinese, ethnic groups in Mali, West Africa and Native American in the United States. Bali's traditional arts, rituals and water temple system of irrigation, Bambara society in Mali and Native American traditional cultures are juxtaposed against the culture change these groups experience with increased global, commercial interdependence. In the 21st century, humankind continues to experience problems of world hunger, population growth, resource depletion, pollution and war. Films, slides and reading review these issues, and peoples, worldwide, to try to consider potential solutions which acknowledge human cultural diversity within the modernization process. An emphasis in the course is a consideration of technological determinism and social choices.

Typography I

Course No. GDS203  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Eugene Pawlowski

This is one of the two central classes in the first year of study in Communication Design (alongside Design for Communication I) In the first semester, students become familiar with the broader discipline of the field through the construction of abstract design concepts, layout, symbols, and sequential systems. Conceptual thinking and the integration of typography with imagery are explored throughout the course. In the 2nd semester, students investigate projects that follow the various sub-fields of the profession; projects include Identity, Web/Interactive, Information and Wayfinding. Students will be assigned multiple projects throughout the year. Each project begins with a lecture and demonstration of techniques. Each week, students practice presentation to the larger group in formal and informal critique and brainstorming sessions. Faculty will work one on one with students to answer questions and assist in the process. Reviews will be held at key points during each project. Offered fall.

Typography II

Course No. GDS204  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Eugene Pawlowski
Prerequisite(s) Typography I

Through the use of studied, well designed and competently executed design solutions, we will emphasize the effective and sensitive use of typeforms in complex and sustained communication projects. The attributes of rhythm, proportion, hierarchy, and progression will be investigated, emphasized, and practiced to produce excellent quality professional solutions.

Projects are carried out in varying degrees of execution including sketchbook roughs, presentation sketches, laser comprehensives, and finished art. Thoughtful experimentation with the software and imaging equipment is encouraged to extend and challenge the process. The course objectives will be pursued through assigned projects, explanations, demonstrations, and group critiques. Prerequisite: GDS203 Typography I or equivalent. Offered spring.

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Cores + Connections

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