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Academics . Courses

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Propaganda: Media, Dissemination, Technique

Course No. PRI 240-340-440  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Maggie Denk-Leigh

From punk bands to political rallies, different techniques have been used to create attention- grabbing graphics. Through a variety of projects in this course, students will explore a range of techniques including approaches to screen-printing from simple stencil making methods; direct drawing on the screens; to a variety of ways to use photo emulsion, including the integration of digital imaging software. The emphasis of this class is the development of rich personal imagery and the relationship of form working with content to effectively communicate ideas. This course is for students from all levels and majors. Notes: Open Elective. Encouraged for Third/Fourth year students as an Elective Studio. Required for Fourth Year Print Majors.

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG231.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students as an elective. Required for Junior Painting Majors.

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG331.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students.

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG431.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students as an elective.

Ptg as system, Method, Organism, & Concept

Course No. PTG326.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

This course examines the nature of Painting as it relates to other visual arts media. The creation of systems as a way to generate, organize, compose, pattern, plan, fashion, model, design, execute, and possibly destroy art work will be explored. Artists such as Sol Lewitt, Marcel Duchamp, Survival Research Laboratories, Vito Acconci, Fischli & Weiss, Chuck Close, Alfred Jensen, Jackson Pollock, and Mel Bochner will be examined within the context of how systems function within their work.Ê Reading relevant texts, looking at work, research/special projects, studio work, group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course. Students may work in the area of their expertise. Goals & Objectives: Students should understand the nature of the decision-making process in the creation of work, and establishing analyzing and evaluating criteria. This course is open to all students.

Ptg as System, Method, Organism, & Concept

Course No. PTG426.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

This course examines the nature of Painting as it relates to other visual arts media. The creation of systems as a way to generate, organize, compose, pattern, plan, fashion, model, design, execute, and possibly destroy art work will be explored. Artists such as Sol Lewitt, Marcel Duchamp, Survival Research Laboratories, Vito Acconci, Fischli & Weiss, Chuck Close, Alfred Jensen, Jackson Pollock, and Mel Bochner will be examined within the context of how systems function within their work.Ê Reading relevant texts, looking at work, research/special projects, studio work, group and individual critiques are an integral part of this course. Students may work in the area of their expertise. Goals & Objectives: Students should understand the nature of the decision-making process in the creation of work, and establishing analyzing and evaluating criteria. This course is open to all students.

Ptg Lab: Explor in Representation & Figuration

Course No. PTG33X.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

This course identifies the components of traditional figurative painting such as space, composition, point of view, color, and scale. Using this as a platform each of these will serve as the subject of a sustained investigation. This approach will function to establish an understanding of these elements in a conventional context as well as the object of experimentation. This course will be useful to students in all areas who are interested in working figuratively in two-dimensions. This course is open to all students.

Ptg Lab: Explor in Representation & Figuration

Course No. PTG43X.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

This course identifies the components of traditional figurative painting such as space, composition, point of view, color, and scale. Using this as a platform each of these will serve as the subject of a sustained investigation. This approach will function to establish an understanding of these elements in a conventional context as well as the object of experimentation. This course will be useful to students in all areas who are interested in working figuratively in two-dimensions. This course is open to all students.

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