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Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 241-341-441  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Culture, Conflict, and Syncretism

Course No. LLC 441  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Olatubosun Ogunsanwo

This course is primarily concerned with the dialectic of multiculturality and multidimensionality. Africans under colonialism, like most of the Third World at one time or the other, were confronted with the overwhelming encroachment of European/Western/Christian ways of life and thought alien to them. Yet Africa still struggles up till today to preserve its integrity, its intrinsic identity, notably in the form of neotraditionalism. This vortex of cultural interplay in Africa has led to socio- cultural phenomenon described as deracination or “the crisis in the soul” (Achebe) or “triple heritage/cultural accommodation” (Ali Mazrui). In postmodernist terms, it has led to syncretism. The course will also explore analogies from the multidimensional art, mainly from the interchange between visual and literary arts. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Design + Craft in Modern Culture

Course No. ACD 462  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gary D. Sampson

This course is an introduction to graphic and three-dimensional design from the Industrial Revolution to the present. We will examine modern and contemporary artists, styles, and objects across the design and craft disciplines, including finely crafted furniture and other objects designed for public and private spaces (architectural details and ornamentation, wallpaper, textiles, lamps, kitchenware, etc.); decorative objects such as ceramics, metalwork, and glass; objects of mass production and consumer culture (cars, trains, cameras, corporate and residential furnishings, electronic goods, etc.); art posters, private press books and illustrations, and innovative forms of communication graphics. Special consideration will be given to the social and cultural meanings of objects, issues related to the design and craft fields as professional occupations, and the art historical and theoretical relationships of the various design and craft disciplines beyond medium (material) specific concerns. Visual Culture Emphasis course. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Design Center

Course No. IND 417  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Douglas Paige

This course functions as a professional design studio, placing an emphasis on client-based projects and interdisciplinary teamwork. All companies/organizations who are participating in the course make a financial commitment to CIA and intern team members are compensated. Compensation varies, but is based on the project budget, time commitment and individual contributions. The faculty, who will oversee the process, deliverables and schedule for each project, will determine studio responsibilities (enrollment requires prior approval by instructor). Offered fall and spring.

Design Center Learning

Course No. EP 417  Credits: 3.0

This course functions as a professional design studio, placing an emphasis on client-based projects and interdisciplinary teamwork. All companies/organizations who are participating in the course make a financial commitment to CIA and intern team members are compensated. Compensation varies, but is based on the project budget, time commitment and individual contributions. The faculty, who will oversee the process, deliverables and schedule for each project, will determine studio responsibilities. Prerequisites for Industrial Design majors: one year of industrial design training and approval by the course faculty. Prerequisite for non-Industrial Design majors: approval of the course faculty. Offered fall and spring.

Design for Communication I

Course No. GDS 265  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Mari Hulick

This is one of the two central classes in the first year of study in Graphic Design (alongside Typography). In the first semester, students become familiar with the broader discipline of the field through the construction of abstract design concepts, layout, symbols, and sequential systems. Conceptual thinking and the integration of typography with imagery are explored throughout the course. In the second semester, students investigate projects that follow the various sub-fields of the profession; projects include identity, web/interactive, information and wayfinding. Students will be assigned multiple projects throughout the year. Each project begins with a lecture and demonstration of techniques. Each week, students practice presentation to the larger group in formal and informal critique and brainstorming sessions. Faculty will work one-on-one with students to answer questions and assist in the process. Reviews will be held at key points during each project. Offered fall.

Design for Communication II

Course No. GDS 266  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Mari Hulick
Prerequisite(s) Design for Communication I

This is one of the two central classes in the first year of study in Graphic Design (alongside Typography). In this course, students investigate projects that follow the various sub-fields of the profession; projects include identity, web/interactive, information and wayfinding. Students will be assigned multiple projects throughout the year. Each project begins with a lecture and demonstration of techniques. Each week, students practice presentation to the larger group in formal and informal critique and brainstorming sessions. Faculty will work one on one with students to answer questions and assist in the process. Reviews will be held at key points during each project. Prerequisite: GDS265 Design for Communication I or permission of instructor. Offered spring.

Design I

Course No. FND 107  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jerry Birchfield Jr | Jessica Pinsky | Jimmy Kuehnle | Kevin Kautenburger | Lane Cooper | Petra Soesemann | Richard Fiorelli | Scott Goss | William Lorton

In this fundamental visual composition course, students learn the primary elements and principles of visual language, and are introduced to a range of formal and conceptual problems which become increasingly complex as the course progresses. Students are challenged to explore core design principles of visual organization in unique and challenging ways, and to gain the ability to problem-solve through ideation processes, group dialogue, perceptual refinement and skill management. Developing analytical skills and the ability to effectively engage in an on-going process of critique are also core components of the course. Design1 involves the planning and organization of the parts within a whole, through a sense of experimentation, risk taking and discovery. This course focuses primarily on two-dimensional forms but also gradually introduces three-dimensional forms. Material exploration and the development of strong manual skills in regard to visual acuity and craft sensitivity are a key aspect of every assignment. Knowledge and skills gained in concurrent Foundation program areas such as color, drawing and digital skills are fundamental for communicating ideas and are reinforced in Design 1. Offered fall.

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Living Dangerously Exhibition

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