share this

Dec. 14: Admissions and Financial Aid 101
Register here.
Share This Search
Cinematheque

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Biomedical Art: Advanced Media Concepts

Course No. BMA 353  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Joseph Pangrace | Thomas Nowacki

This course serves as the first iteration of media concepts and problems courses in Biomedical Art, and builds on observational and other skills acquired from preceding Biomedical Methods courses. The course focuses on digital illustration and drawing techniques which help to explore editorial, narrative and educational communication problems. The scope of the course entails developing skills and knowledge necessary for effective visual communication of biomedical concepts and subject matter such as human anatomy, veterinary/zoology subjects, body systems and natural science subject matter. The focus will be on developing advanced visual storytelling skills. Students will learn to take complex information presented by specific biomedical art subject matter and selectively simplify it to solve visual communication problems effectively. Students will work exclusively in digital media will to develop practical competence in the rendering methodologies and learn the conventions of modern production. When appropriate, project-based learning and client relationships will be incorporated into the course for specific assignments and exercises. The course is also used for non-majors to develop strong skills in digital illustration/drawing techniques (Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign). Students outside the Biomedical Art major will not be required to produce illustrations based on biomedical content, but instead will focus on developing visually illustrated narrative projects, of equal complexity, pertinent to their own areas of interest. Offered fall.

Biomedical Art: Forensic Imaging/Modeling

Course No. BMA 356-456  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Elizabeth Halasz

This course is an introduction to forensic modeling and reconstruction methods and concepts; which brings materials developed in the medical and forensic industry to the sculpture lab. Materials such as clay, plaster, alginate used in body casting, silicone molding materials, polyurethanes, and clear casting materials will be used in projects that reconstruct facial, and human body elements from skull and environmental clues. The course will utilize the Cleveland Museum of Natural History specimens, and possible visits to local Forensic Agencies for additional hands on applications. Experimentation and integration of sculpture methods to produce body and facial reconstructions will be explored. The course is open to all majors and non-majors as an elective; no previous experience necessary.

Biomedical Art: Interactive Narratives

Course No. BMA 359  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Thomas Nowacki

This course serves as an introductory platform to investigate and discover object, environment, human and natural science 2D/web-based animation, in addition to basic interface design, to create a narrative with goals to communicate a message and/or educate and instruct the viewer. The student will use the concept of narrative to tell animated short stories of the body, environment and/or natural science through the medium of Adobe Flash (using AS 3.0) in conjunction with Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver. Within the course, strong conceptual skills are emphasized and developed through professional production techniques, workflow and time-based linear media. The principles of 2D animation and web-based interface design will be used as the foundation for understanding how to communicate a message. Learning the ideas of simplistic object, environment and body motion accuracy/timing will be taught in 2D and students will be expected to create simple to complex animations (based on level and individual progress.) This course is designed to benefit all majors AND non-majors with required prerequisites. Offered fall.

Biomedical Art: Internship

Course No. BMA 399-499  Credits: 3.0

This course is designed as a 3 credit professional internship in the area of biomedical art; and in association with an industry-specific job (client, company or institution). Any major seeking to register for the Biomedical Art Internship must seek prior approval by the chair of the Biomedical Art Department. The internship will be graded in accordance with CIA grading standards, and professional review with the client providing the opportunity

BMA: Advanced Problems, Concepts + Media

Course No. BMA 354  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Thomas Nowacki

In this course the student will continue investigating complex concepts and techniques in Biomedical media and apply them to advanced visual communication problems. The focus will be on developing conceptual visual story-telling skills (First in sketch form/storyboarding for client proofing, then rendered digitally for final art). Students will learn to take complex information presented by biomedical subject matter and simplify it to solve visual communication problems effectively for the target audience. Advanced digital illustration techniques in Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and the integration of flash will be used as the basis to solve illustration problems. Students outside the major will learn techniques and concepts in visual communication for editorial and narrative based projects. Offered spring.

BMA: Intro to 3D Animation

Course No. BMA 346  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) 3D Bioforms: Intro to 3D Modeling

This course serves as an introductory platform to investigate and discover object, environment, human and natural science 3D animation to create a narrative with goals to communicate a message and/or educate and instruct the viewer. The student will use the concept of narrative to tell animated short stories of the body, environment and/or natural science through the medium of 3D digital animation software. Within the course, strong conceptual skills are emphasized and developed through professional production techniques, workflow and time-based linear media. Successful animation breathes life into motion with clear communication of thought, emotion, narrative or experience. Any moving object is a “character” in film or animation. We will hold regular discussions and workshops on how the dialogue of an otherwise stagnant object changes and evolves when put to motion. Methods of instruction will consist of lectures, demonstrations, art + scientific research, studio assignments, in-class lab time, and group critiques. The principles of 3D space and motion/timing will be used as the foundation for understanding how to communicate a message through animation. Learning the ideas of simplistic object, environment and body motion accuracy/timing will be taught in 3D and students will be expected to create simple to complex animations (based on level and individual progress.) The computer will be explored like other art media and will serve as a tool for creation. This course is designed to benefit all majors AND non-majors who have had a prerequisite course in 3D modeling.

Cellular + Molecular Illustration

Course No. BMA 370X-470X  Credits: 3.0

This course will focus on the current techniques for visualizing and illustrating the cellular structure and molecules that make up living organisms: phospholipid bilayers, chemical exchange, carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, nucleic acids, etc. The ability to accurately represent cellular and molecular structures has become critical with recent advances in microbiology, biotechnology, genetics, and pharmacology. You will learn how to locate 3D molecular model files on the Internet and manipulate these models on the computer. Working from conceptual drawings, you will use these files to render (and possibly animate) molecules in 2D using Photoshop and/or Illustrator and in 3D using a modeling application (such as 3D Studio Max).

Censorship, Art, and the Law

Course No. HCS 386  Credits: 3.0

This course will cover the history of censorship in America. We will begin with the language of the First Amendment. We will then study the evolution of the definition of obscenity starting with the Comstack Laws and moving through the current Supreme Court test for determining whether an expression is obscene. We will look at the laws surrounding child pornography as well as hate speech and art that incite violence. For each of these categories of expression, we will discuss anecdotal applications of the First Amendment using artists such as Mapplethorpe, Serrano, Ligon, Zimmerman, Scott, Diana and Finley. While the primary focus of the class will be on government action, we will also look at examples of self censorship by the entertainment industry and public galleries. Finally, we will finish with an overview of the Patriot Act, its current applications and its implications for our future freedom of expression. The question underlying all of the historical context, anecdotal applications and the current law is why do we censor? Are there ever legitimate justifications for censorship and if so, how do we, as a society, draw those lines? In addressing these issues, we will study in depth the feminist anti-pornography movement, excerpts from Susan Sontag's On Photography, and the outcry over music lyrics post Columbine.

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

Read More

Support CIA

Show the world creativity matters: make a gift to the annual fund.

Read More

Living Dangerously Exhibition

Reinberger Gallery’s fall exhibition opens November 4.

Read More

Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.