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Survey of Contemporary Music

Course No. HCS 309  Credits: 3.0

This course will give an overview of avant-garde music written in the twentieth (and twenty-first) centuries, with particular emphasis on the relationships between music and the visual arts. Discussions in class will focus on composers whose work helped define contemporary music while creating aesthetic parallels to the visual arts. Emphasis will be placed on listening to avant-garde and experimental music, and students will be expected to attend several recitals of contemporary music and write about their experiences. Students will also have to complete reading and listening assignments on a regular basis. May be applied as Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Sustainability: LEED + Detailing

Course No. INTA 390X  Credits: 3.0

This course introduces students to LEED and Sustainable practices preparing students for the LEED certification process. In the second half of the course students will learn to detail their designs in preparation for fabrication/implementation while taking into consideration ethical and sustainable fabrication methods and material selections. Open elective, sophomore and above, no prerequisites required. Required for all junior Interior Architecture majors. Offered spring.

Systems Drawing

Course No. DRG 360-460  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Wulffen | Lane Cooper

This course will investigate the means by which various systems of drawing and representation function as methods of communication. How do historical, cultural and social contexts frame an artist's ability to send messages through their work? And, like in a game of telephone, in any system of communication it is inevitable that potential problems may occur- misunderstandings, errors, and falsehoods. Can these absorbed into the content of the work? Illusionistic, abstract, allegorical, diagrammatic, mathematical and idiosyncratic systems of drawing and representation will be investigated through this course, through studio practice, readings, critique and in-class discussion. Required of all junior Drawing majors.

The Artist + Social Practice (EP)

Course No. SEM 280-380-480  Credits: 3.0

This course explores a realm of artistic endeavor usually apart from the gallery system and the art market, where the artist applies his/her talents to questions directly related to community, social responsibility, and political activism. While looking critically at recent manifestations in relational and participatory practices—as well as learning about their historical context and interdependence with other fields—students will work within a greater social context, applying their skills to pressing issues (such as ecology, urban decay, poverty, discrimination, violence, and global abuses of the military-industrial complex, to name a few). The pedagogical approach will be to present projects realized by other artists who have worked in these areas, and to be able to contextualize these practices as the result/reflection of our current economic, political, and cultural situation(s), both nationally and internationally.

Students will research issues that are of greater concern to them individually, and present them to the class. This will be followed by in-depth discussion around problem solving, efficacy of action, and aesthetic materialization. Projects will then be developed and implemented throughout the semester.

The Artist's Practice in Context

Course No. VAT 200X-300X-400X  Credits: 1.5

As a complement to the Professional Practices course, “The Artist’s Practice in Context” is specifically designed for Visual Arts majors. The course takes an intimate look at the professional practices of artists working in major metropolitan areas such as New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles or Berlin. As part of the course students examine the realities of maintaining a professional practice within the context of this focus community. Students, guided and directed by faculty, are immersed in that community through such activities as studio visits; meeting with area arts professionals and at art venues. Open to all. Students must be 18 years old or over and must sign a waiver to travel with the group. Course may be taken more than once for additional credit.

The Body: Tradition, Transformation, Transgression

Course No. ACD 458  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Rita Goodman

This seminar-style course will explore one of the most important themes of twentieth-century visual art: the body (male and female). We will discuss a complex range of ideas and values associated with the nude (and naked) body as it has been re-presented in 20th c. photography; painting; sculpture/installation; performance and body art; and video. While the "great tradition" of the nude will be introduced, the course will focus on art produced since the 1950s (from the late modern to the postmodern era). Among other topics, we will study the visual body as a representational site for the self; for erotic desire; for the political position of women; and for formal experimentation. We will look at art that presents bodies which are very much outside tradition: i.e., bodies that are sick, decaying, dying, dead, aging, obese, androgynous, deformed, etc. Topics and terms of analysis will include: the traditional nude; feminist critiques of sexism; voyeurism; "exploitation," "obscenity," and censorship; objectification (gaze theory) sexuality; the nude self-portrait and portrait; parody and quotation; the female nude and modernism; Kenneth Clark's nude-naked (ideal-real) dichotomy; identity and performance; and formal aestheticizing of the body. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

The Contemporary Portrait (EP)

Course No. PHV 228-328-428  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Nancy McEntee
Prerequisite(s) Photo 1: Introduction to Photography | Fundamentals of Studio Lighting (EP)

This course is an exploration of contemporary approaches to portraiture and its relation to the historical photographic portrait. Analysis of both simple and complex photographic identities and real and invented realities are investigated. Photographic assignments, readings and discussions lead to a better understanding of the student’s individual approach to the portrait and their unique relationship with the subject. Practical applications of Photographic portraiture will also be discussed. Prerequisites: PHV 295 Photo I: Intro to Photography; PHV 292 Fundamentals of Studio Lighting, or Instructor signature. Open studio elective.

The Fine Art of Silver Print

Course No. PHV 270-370-470  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Nancy McEntee
Prerequisite(s) Photo 1: Introduction to Photography

This is an advanced level black and white silver printing class. We will investigate advanced film exposure and archival printing techniques, fine art printing papers, developer combinations and toning procedures to produce full tonal range darkroom prints. Medium and large format cameras will be demonstrated and utilized. Projects for this class include an in-depth self-assignment finalized in a portfolio of archival silver prints. We will also view master fine art prints at local galleries, museums and collections. Required for sophomore photography majors. Open studio elective. Prerequisite: PHV 295 Photo I: Intro to Photography or instructor’s signature. Offered spring.

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The Art of Exchange

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