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Role of the Artist as Producer (EP)

Course No. VAT 400  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper | Sarah Paul

Contemporary artists have a multitude of ways they can engage with the larger world, beyond the realm of the gallery or museum. Students enrolled in this course will explore various models of artistic production including, but not limited to, performer, activist, curator and provocateur. The relationship between method of creation and idea, or the handmade versus the industrial, will be investigated. Additionally, assignments will challenge students to analyze the content of their artwork within local, national, and global contexts. Coursework will include studio work, readings, discussion, and critiques. Required for VAT seniors in all majors. Open as an elective with approval of instructor. Offered fall.

Science Fiction + Fantasy

Course No. LLC 210W  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Magallanes Moody

The genre (or sub-genre) of science fiction may, on one level, be seen as a variety of Romanticism, as an extended collective response to features of modernity, specifically scientific discoveries and innovations, as well as elements of the Industrial and technological revolutions. Science fiction, in its astonishing number of permutations, has filled a vast canvas of imaginative possibility, discovering a range of responses and forms that range from the dystopian, pessimistic, even nihilistic, to the utopian. We hear and see, in the voices and imaginations of different science fiction writers and artists, warnings and celebrations, but at the bottom, questionings of what it means to be human and of what kinds of possibilities may lay before us. Science fiction is also a remarkably popular genre; it’s vitally manifested in books, television shows, films, toys, games. In this class we will investigate some of the space(s), both literal and metaphorical, that science fiction (and popular ideas of science) offer to the imagination. The course’s center, however, is the students’ own writing and their own ideas, and will be conducted in workshop format, with relatively brief lectures by the instructor presenting relevant literary, historical, theoretical and biographical backgrounds and contexts. During the semester, students will present two to three original works-in-progress (either creative or critical) to the class, distributing photocopies of their work a week in advance to the members of the class and to the instructor.

Screenwriting

Course No. LLC 318  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Scott Lax | Shelley Costa Bloomfield

What is a spec script, a slugline, a smash cut? What's the difference between montage and a series of shots, and why does the screenwriter need to know? One script page averages how many minutes of onscreen film time? In addition to the demands of just plain good storytelling, writing for film entails expressing everything about the story visually, which gives visual artists an advantage in adapting to the demands of the form. It is the screenwriter's job to put all of the sights, sounds and speeches on the page, while still leaving room for interpretation by the filmmakers. In this course we will discuss the elements of good storytelling, study the screenplays of Pulp Fiction and Chocolat, and write a short screenplay formatted to conform to industry standards. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Sculpture + Expanded Media: BFA Research

Course No. SEM 429  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara | Sarah Paul

As an extension of our goal that students develop the ability to generate self-directed work, this class seeks to provide each student with opportunity to develop the skills and knowledge to identify and sustain an independent practice. This course is designed to increase student awareness of the current art discourse and the ability to use that knowledge as a means of awareness within the production of their own work. This educational process embraces a variety of approaches to basic problem-solving skills measured against the contemporary practices of the discipline. In cooperation with a major-day faculty, students are expected to develop what is often their first significant independent work. For BFA students the focus of this course centers on artistic production, conditions of conveyance and presentation. Required at the senior level for all SEM majors. Offered fall.

Sculpture + Expanded Media: BFA Research + Exhibition

Course No. SEM 430  Credits: 3.0

Required for all senior Sculpture + Expanded Media majors. Offered spring.

Sculpture + Expanded Media: Internship (EP)

Course No. SEM 399-499  Credits: 0.0

Elective credit can be given on a case-by-case basis for an internship developed by student through the Career Center office, with advance permission of the department chair.

Senior Studio: BFA Research

Course No. PTG 421M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper | Michael Meier

Required for all 4th year Painting majors and open as an elective to any senor-level student with a prerequisite of Intro to Painting or permission of the instructor or Painting Chair. This course focuses on developing the student’s individual work as it relates to their subject and their means of making work. Emphasis will be on the strategies for constructing the meaning of the work in terms of materials and the way the work is read by a viewer. Students will read work, develop and discuss intention through critiques and discourse. The goal is to develop an understanding of the criteria, standards and values promoted by the artist and how these come to be understood by their audience by exploring the relationship between subject, form, material and process as they relate to content. Offered fall.

Serial Painting and Drawing

Course No. CDE 200  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz

Students focus on the creative process and material studies across the craft majors. From inspiration to the production of multiples, each major explores design and making through their respective mediums as well as other materials. The sophomores in the Craft + Design environment address common themes while working in their respective major: Ceramics, Glass, and Jewelry + Metals. The course affords the integration of skills and knowledge from Foundation including drawing, design, color, digital synthesis, and collaboration, with the practices related to the full scope of the Craft + Design major programs. Offered fall.

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