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Story: Jan 09, 2015

Time-lapse video shows completion of major construction on n...

View details 35th Annual Scholastic Art & Writing Exhibition

CIA Exhibition: Jan 15, 2015

35th Annual Scholastic Art & Writing Exhibition

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Story: Jan 08, 2015

Recognition, milestones were highlights of 2014 for CIA

View details CIA Freshman Mail Art at MOCA

Events: Jan 19, 2015 @ Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland in Cleveland, OH

CIA Freshman Mail Art at MOCA

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Social: about 13 hours ago via Facebook

Reminder, this is the LAST week were waiving the $40 application fee. You can apply here: http://ow.ly/HXqlC

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Story: Dec 23, 2014

Printmaking project links students with seniors and their st...

View details 69th Annual Student Independent Exhibition

CIA Exhibition: Feb 13, 2015

69th Annual Student Independent Exhibition

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Story: Nov 03, 2014

CIA video shows off new Uptown Residence Hall

View details CIA Campus Connection: Presidents' Day

Events: Feb 16, 2015

CIA Campus Connection: Presidents' Day

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Story: Aug 18, 2014

CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Weaving Patterns: Collective Activity

Course No. FIB275  Credits: 3.0
Faculty William Lorton

Students will learn to weave and explore the possibilities of the process on traditional floor looms (floor, tapestry, Computer-assisted Dobby) and alternative weaving devices (constructed from found objects or using architectural influences). Technical vocabulary and conceptual focus will be developed through an investigation of process, material, tools and the many and varied histories of weaving. The intersection between weaving and collaboration will be explored in discussions on the development of pattern/structure as a form of communication; looms built in situ; implication of globalization on craft production; traditional and contemporary practice of gifting; and social participation. Required sophomore FMS majors. Open elective.

Web Design/Interactive I

Course No. GDS 305  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Pat Lally
Prerequisite(s) Design for Communication I

Through this course, students will learn how to use different software tools to design, implement, and produce a Graphic User Interface. Our efforts will be mostly concentrated on creating web/internet/ interactive projects, as these will allow for the exercise of ideas and tools across the entire design spectrum. Students will have a grasp of the essential technology used for web applications: the Hyper-Text Markup Language (including HTML 5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). You will be introduced to several techniques that will allow you to begin making interactive applications, which include PHP, JQuery and Javascript, as well as looking at user experience and design of apps for smart phone and pads. The course will also include an introduction to designing and creating Epub formats. Prerequisite: GDS265 Design for Communication I or permission of fall instructor.

Web Design/Interactive I

Course No. CDS405.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Design for Communication I

Through this course, students will learn how to use different software tools to design, implement, and produce a Graphic User Interface. Our efforts will be mostly concentrated on creating web/internet/ interactive projects, as these will allow for the exercise of ideas and tools across the entire design spectrum. Students will have a grasp of the essential technology used for web applications: the Hyper-Text Markup Language (including HTML 5) and Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). You will be introduced to several techniques that will allow you to begin making interactive applications, which include PHP, JQuery and Javascript, as well as looking at user experience and design of apps for smart phone and pads. The course will also include an introduction to designing and creating Epub formats.

Web Design/Interactive II

Course No. GDS 305B  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Pat Lally
Prerequisite(s) Web Design/Interactive I

This class builds and expands the study begun in Web Design/Interactive 1 (Graphic User Interface 1). Students move to more advanced structures and interface ideas. Experimental possibilities are explored as students develop web and portable device designs, furthering the skills learned in the first section of the class. Prerequisite: GDS 305 Web Design/Interactive I.

Web Practice + Presence

Course No. IME 320  Credits: 0.0

In this course, students will learn about various strategies of making websites and how these are part of contemporary practice as an artist. The ability to frame a project, solve a problem, do research, then implement and use web techniques is explored in this course. Projects will explore the contemporary practice of working with web technologies in professional practice including using FTP, social networking tools and listings, and other interactive forms. Learning basic HTML, exploring online existing portfolio solutions, accessibility, hosting, and ftp will be part of this course. In class students will experience interacting with website examples, discussing selected readings, doing weekly assignments, and participating in critiques. Offered fall and spring.

Woman's Words

Course No. LLC 424  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Joyce Kessler

This course is designed to outline the contributions of women to the origins and development of the novel genre in English and American literature from 1688 to the present time. It will focus on discovery of the relationships between the earliest women's literary production and the literature written by the women of this moment. It will inquire into the areas of race and social class as they are directly relevant to (or feature as tropes within) the literature comprising our reading list. It also introduces some of the basic theoretical questions that feminist scholarship has raised in connection with women's writing during these periods. Through selected readings, research, and critical discussion, members of this class will become familiar with modern women's literature, its social/historical contexts, and some of the feminist critical approaches through which it has been considered. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Working Collaboratively + Group Dynamics

Course No. VAT 354-454  Credits: 3.0

Though the image of the artist is that of the solitary individual striving to express their vision Ð the contemporary practice of art is peppered with numerous examples of artists collaborating. This course will focus on how the presentations of images, and objects have been effected by changing social and cultural perspectives and the technologies of reproduction. These extend form something as simple as organizing a group exhibition, to the type of social interventions practiced by the Guerrilla Girls or the work of such entities as Gilbert and George, or the collective N55. This course through projects, readings, and critiques will explore the dynamic of working collaboratively. Each exercise will address different processes, skill-sets and interpersonal relationships. Through classroom discussion, lectures, and studio assignments the social, historical, cultural, technological context that gave rise to the current practices of collage, assemblage and installation will be elaborated. This course is open to majors from all disciplines and students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to assignments and classroom readings and discussion. This course is open to students from all disciplines and is not media specific.

Working Collaboratively and Group Dynamics

Course No. VAT454.1  Credits: 0.0

Though the image of the artist is that of the solitary individual striving to express their vision the contemporary practice of art is peppered with numerous examples of artists collaborating. This course will focus on how the presentations of images, and objects have been effected by changing social and cultural perspectives and the technologies of reproduction. These extend form something as simple as organizing a group exhibition, to the type of social interventions practiced by the Guerrilla Girls or the work of such entities as Gilbert and George, or the collective N55. This course through projects, readings, and critiques will explore the dynamic of working collaboratively. Each exercise will address different processes, skill-sets and interpersonal relationships. Through classroom discussion, lectures, and studio assignments the social, historical, cultural, technological context that gave rise to the current practices of collage, assemblage and installation will be elaborated. This course is open to majors from all disciplines and students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to assignments and classroom readings and discussion. This course is open to students from all disciplines and is not media specific. 3 credits.

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

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Community Works

Visiting artists, exhibitions, conference and symposia exploring socially engaged art.

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SPECTRUM CIA 2015

Save the date. Four celebration events.

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Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.