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Advanced Hot Glass: Concept, Theory + Practice

Course No. GLS 343A-443A  Credits: 3.0

Assignments given at all levels; independent projects at 400. Includes research and development of concepts using glass as a media for expression. Practice in advanced hot glass working further building on fundamentals of blowing off-hand to more advanced techniques surface decoration of vessels and use of hot glass for sculptural ideas. Advanced methods for forming may include hot casting, mold blowing, using multiples; cold joining using special adhesives; and cold glass, cutting grinding and finishing techniques. Emphasis on hot glass. Safety and general studio operation. For Glass majors and advanced electives. Course fee required. May be repeated. Prerequisites: One semester of hot glass.

Advanced Studio Lighting

Course No. PHV 293X-393X-493X  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Fundamentals of Studio Lighting

This is an advanced-level course that facilitates discussion of the visual language of lighting for photographic processes in the larger context of contemporary art, photography, cinema, and digital media. Building on skills learned in Fundamentals of Studio Lighting, Advanced Studio Lighting expands the student’s knowledge of controlled artificial light. This course emphasizes the process involved to produce a portfolio of both portrait and product images, in a coherent body of work based on a theme, concept, or selected subject matter. The course focuses on how photographers and filmmakers use lighting as an element of storytelling. Students investigate the theory and practice of lighting within the history of photography and cinema lighting design. A component of the course engages students collaboratively to develop and execute lighting for a variety of scenes, presented for peer critique. Coursework also includes regular screenings and discussions of films, written papers and lab exercises. Prerequisite: PHV292 Fundamentals of Studio Lighting.

Advertising + Consumer Culture

Course No. ACD 448  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Rita Goodman

This course will examine advertisements in the print media with respect to various elements, including: economic and social class; race; ethnic identity; age; gender; and sexuality. The course begins with an introduction to the method of analysis called semiotics, the techniques of which will be used to determine how advertisements convey their messages and how they address themselves to particular consumers. In addition to the elements outlined above, we will discuss several recent controversial issues. While this course will not center on a history of advertising, it will treat the historical place of print advertising in a capitalist consumer culture. Interventionist tactics by various artists that attempt to subvert the economic and ideological function of ads will also be examined. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

African American Art

Course No. ACD 334  Credits: 3.0

This course covers African American art from the late 1700s to the present emphasizing the formal qualities of art as well as the social and cultural contexts within which it was created. Lectures and assigned readings are drawn from the scholarship of art history, literature, anthropology and history. We examine works by U.S. Artists of African descent and others who engage aspects of African American life and culture. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Alternative Photographic Processes

Course No. PHV 291-391-491  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Mary Jo Toles
Prerequisite(s) Photo 1: Introduction to Photography | Digital Photo Imaging I for Non-Majors

This course investigates the historical processes, contemporary practices, and concepts of alternative photography. This includes non-silver techniques, hand-applied emulsions, chemical, digital and hybrid processes for photographic imaging. Processes demonstrated may include Cyanotype, Van Dyke Brown, Wet Plate Collodion, Platinum-Palladium, Liquid Emulsion and silver and non-silver toning options. Large-format negatives for non-silver processes are generated using conventional film cameras, paper and digital negatives as well as photogram and pinhole photography. This course is project-based, involves research and experimentation, and is conducted through hands-on demos and instructional workshops. Open studio elective. Recommended for Photography majors. Prerequisites: PHV 295 Photo I: Intro to Photography or; PHV 201 Digital Photo Imaging I, or instructor signature.

American Crafts History

Course No. ACD 376  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Mark Bassett

This course will necessarily focus on American crafts. However, an effort will be made to incorporate other expressions (especially non-Western) into the mix too. For example, there are readings in Adamson on the Scandinavian slöjd system, Bauhaus aesthetics, the Japanese concept of mingei, the Indian notion of svadharma, the Mande blacksmiths of West Africa, and subversive (feminist) stitchery, in addition to writings by Anni Albers, Karl Marx, Frank Lloyd Wright, Ellen Gates Starr, George Nakashima, Carole Tulloch, Garth Clark, and many more. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

An Introduction to African Art

Course No. ACD 358  Credits: 3.0
Faculty David Hart | Katherine Flach

This art history course provides an introduction to the visual art traditions of sub-Saharan Africa from ancient cultures to the present. Lectures and readings are drawn from art historical scholarship as well as from other disciplines (anthropology, archaeology, visual culture studies) that provide a sense of the social, political and religious contexts within which the art was created and used. The study of African art from a Western perspective presents questions that are covered in class: When and under what circumstances did “Africa” as a concept emerge? Did Africans consider their works “art” in the same sense that Westerners use that term? How did Western museums acquire African art and how does that inform the way we understand African works? In what ways did colonialism, the spread of Islam and Christianity, pan- Africanism and post-colonial movements affect artistic production? How do we understand modernism in an African context? Fulfills non-Western or cross-cultural art history requirement. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Anatomy for the Artist

Course No. BMA 250  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Elizabeth Halasz

This course is required for sophomore Biomedical Art majors and is also open to elective students on a space-available basis for studio or liberal arts social/natural science credit. The course is designed to strengthen the students’ understanding and use of figure anatomy within their work. Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of biomedical art, the course will have two complementary components. These components reflect a multidisciplinary approach to muscular anatomy and figure drawing. Study in this area is designed to provide the student with a good grasp of muscular anatomy as it strongly relates to drawing the figure and its proportions. This course will provide the student the opportunity to interpret anatomy knowledge by working directly from the model and human cadaver from CWRU Anatomy Department This course is designed to provide the student with a solid basic understanding of muscular anatomy as it relates to surface anatomy, proportion and movement of the human figure. The course incorporates lectures on anatomy, figure proportion and drawing techniques linked to direct and accurate observation of the figure model and cadaver model. Offered spring.

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