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Academics . Printmaking . Courses

Printmaking Courses

Artist's Book Now: Artist's Book as Image

Course No. PRI 231-331-431  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jennifer Craun

This studio course focuses on boundaries of book form, emphasis on image and concept, and selection of appropriate form [output] to content. Students will be encouraged to view the book as a conceptual space. Deeper development of sequencing and narrative in traditional and nontraditional formats. Forms covered on individual project basis as dictated by idea/concept for appropriate output/manifestation. Considerations include sculptural, installation, digital output, etc. Examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library's artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Notes: This course is open to all, and fulfills an introductory, intermediate and advanced level elective course.

Artist's Book: Narrative + Form

Course No. PRI 232-332-432  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Corrie Slawson | Jennifer Craun

This course is for students interested in producing sequentially developed imagery via linear book structures. Historical examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library’s artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Due to technological advancements over the last century artists now have a variety of media with which to explore output of book projects. The class will expose students to the nature and potential of different book structures as well as a variety of materials. The course will heighten the student’s ability to utilize the interaction of sequenced content—the act of turning pages—to express the continuity of an idea flowing through a continuum. Students realize the potential of narrative, sequence, and pacing, together with the importance of combining word and image. Open Elective. One semester required for Print majors for graduation.

BFA Thesis + Statement

Course No. VAT 493  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara | Lane Cooper | Sarah Kabot

This course is meant to supplement the work done in the student’s major studio classes. It focuses on preparing the BFA candidate for their exhibition, BFA Thesis Paper, Short Artist’s Statement and BFA Thesis Examination. The BFA Review process is comprised of four components: Documentation; Exhibition; BFA Thesis Paper and Short Artist’s Statement (Abstract); and BFA Thesis Examination (Oral Defense/Review). As part of the course, these requirements will be reviewed in technical terms as well as in the context of professional practices in general. The BFA thesis paper is meant to prepare the student for their BFA thesis examination and to provide the foundation for professional practices beyond graduation. It is an opportunity for an in-depth consideration of work and studio practice. Within the paper and among other questions, students are expected to address: “What is the work? What is the reasonable expectation for how it will be received by a given audience? What is the work’s historical and contemporary context? What are the sources for the work? What choices were made in realizing the work and how do they contribute to the reception of the work?” This course is open to all seniors regardless of major but is required by all Visual Arts seniors. Offered spring.

Collage + Assemblage

Course No. VAT 212-312-412  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Ingrisano

Collage and Assemblage are among the most radical innovations of the early 20th century and these forms remain relevant today as sources for innovation and experimentation. Each of these forms acknowledges the fracture of contemporary life and the ongoing need for new means of expression. This course will explore the relationship between collage and assemblage and various disciplines within the visual arts including Painting, Print, and Drawing. Students will learn to discern the significantly different effects and content of the wide range of strategies these approaches encompass. Through classroom discussion, lectures, readings, critiques and studio work students will explore the possibilities available through collage and assemblage. Emphasis will be given to the historical and contemporary studio practices associated with collage and assemblage. This course is open to all students from all majors. Students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to the studio work.

Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 241-341-441  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Expanded Print: New Imaging

Course No. PRI 276-376-476  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper

This intermediate/advanced studio course offers an exploration in printmaking, considering the digital matrix for computer-aided and hand-pulled prints through processes redefined in the digital age, scrutinizing decisions for information in and information out, and the relationship to those decisions. Students will be challenged to work in the territory of digital media in relationship to and combination with traditional print medium. Students have the opportunity to create files for output which are hand drawn, digitally generated, of a photographic nature, or a combination of all three. Topics include transfer methods, digital production of plates, color management for wide-format digital printing, photolithography, and exploration of media choices to project ideas. Technical and critical discussion in this course will be informed by the presentation of processes that have been developed over the past few decades, and how these developments relate and affect print culture today. Open elective. Encouraged for third/fourth year students. Required for third-year Print majors.

Image + Form I

Course No. VAT 200  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Daniel Tranberg | Sarah Kabot | William Lorton

Promotes a general understanding of how images work and are developed, which is a fundamental aspect of the visual arts. The course introduces students to the various means by which images can be rendered, such as by drawing, painting, carving, embroidering, etching, etc., as well as by digital means, by appropriation, and by the use of ready-mades. The students are also introduced to the diverse ways in which images and forms can be manipulated, or manifested conceptually and materially by exploring the inter-relation between 2 and 3 dimensions, as well as in time-based media by the use of collage or assemblage. In doing this, we introduce students to the concept that an image’s “form,” consisting of its physical and spatial qualities, as well as the technical qualities of their chosen mode of production, is part of its content. By these means they are introduced to the practical and semiotic nature of images and their production in the context of the contemporary by means of assignments, readings, discussions, and studio critiques. Open as elective to all majors. This course is required for all sophomore students in Visual Arts. Offered fall.

Image + Form II: Reproducibility

Course No. VAT 202  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Maggie Denk-Leigh | Sarah Kabot

Reproducibility (offered with an emphasis on either 2D or 3D production) introduces the student to the idea that the uniqueness of the work of art is not an intrinsic or inherent quality of the work itself, but the result of the choice of media. Consequently since the Renaissance and the advent of Printmaking, the printing press, and bronze casting, multiplicity and reproduction have been a part of western culture. The machine age, photo-reproduction, lithography, industrial standardization, modularity, fabrication, and multiplicity became part of artistic practice. Prints, posters, ready-mades, objects, books, commix, and designed utilitarian objects editions, multiples, modules, and reproductions are now a significant aspect of contemporary art making which abandons the notion of the unique work Making works of this kind requires the artist to take into consideration the how the act of reproduction, or replication constitutes part their workÕs form and content. Open as elective to all majors. This course is required for all sophomore students in VATe. Offered spring.

CIA's application fee waived Nov. 1-Jan. 31

CIA's application fee waived Nov. 1-Jan. 31

Get started here.

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Liz Maugans

Liz Maugans

Adjunct Faculty

Liz is co-founder and executive director of Zygote Press, a nonprofit center to promote contemporary fine-art ...more

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