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Painting

Academics . Painting . Courses

Painting Courses

Popular Culture + Imagery

Course No. VAT 227P-327P-427P  Credits: 3.0

This course will explore the symbiotic relationship of art and culture, and the particular ways in which popular and material culture influence the visual arts and vice versa today (if there are indeed any particular ways that stand out in this particular time as opposed to a different time in history). Students will learn to discern both the overt and covert affects/ effects of culture on contemporary artists as well as on their own work and that of their peers. Students in order to take part in relevant classroom conversation/discussion need a working knowledge of current events/history/popular culture and will need to be ready to read and do research, etc. Open to all students.

Popular Culture + Imagery: A Painting Course

Course No. PTG 227-327-427  Credits: 3.0

This course will explore the symbiotic relationship of art and culture, and the particular ways in which popular and material culture influence the visual arts and vice versa NOW (if there are indeed any particular ways that stand out in this particular time as opposed to a different time in history). Students will learn to discern both the overt and covert affects/effects of culture on contemporary artists as well as Êon their own work and that of their peers. Students in order to take part in relevant class room conversation/discussion need a working knowledge of current events/ history/popular culture and will need to be ready to read and do research, etc. Open to all students.

Role of the Artist as Producer

Course No. VAT 400  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Indra Lacis | Josť Carlos Teixeira | Lane Cooper | Sarah Paul

Contemporary artists have a multitude of ways they can engage with the larger world, beyond the realm of the gallery or museum. Students enrolled in this course will explore various models of artistic production including, but not limited to, performer, activist, curator and provocateur. The relationship between method of creation and idea, or the handmade versus the industrial, will be investigated. Additionally, assignments will challenge students to analyze the content of their artwork within local, national, and global contexts. Coursework will include studio work, readings, discussion, and critiques. Required for VAT seniors in all majors. Open as an elective with approval of instructor. Offered fall.

Senior Studio: BFA Research

Course No. PTG 421M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lane Cooper

Required for all 4th year Painting majors and open as an elective to any senor-level student with a prerequisite of Intro to Painting or permission of the instructor or Painting Chair. This course focuses on developing the student’s individual work as it relates to their subject and their means of making work. Emphasis will be on the strategies for constructing the meaning of the work in terms of materials and the way the work is read by a viewer. Students will read work, develop and discuss intention through critiques and discourse. The goal is to develop an understanding of the criteria, standards and values promoted by the artist and how these come to be understood by their audience by exploring the relationship between subject, form, material and process as they relate to content. Offered fall.

Silkscreen

Course No. VAT 270-370-470  Credits: 3.0

Students will investigate surface, mark, and materiality from both a technical and conceptual point of view. The silkscreen can accept a wide variety of printing substances (pigments, inks, dyes, mud, talc, honey, etc), and can be applied to an equally diverse range of surfaces. Lectures, readings, and critiques will help students understand the historical role of screenprint and how it relates to their own work. Open elective for all students above the freshman level.

The Artist's Practice in Context

Course No. VAT 200X-300X-400X  Credits: 1.5

As a complement to the Professional Practices course, “The Artist’s Practice in Context” is specifically designed for Visual Arts majors. The course takes an intimate look at the professional practices of artists working in major metropolitan areas such as New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles or Berlin. As part of the course students examine the realities of maintaining a professional practice within the context of this focus community. Students, guided and directed by faculty, are immersed in that community through such activities as studio visits; meeting with area arts professionals and at art venues. Open to all. Students must be 18 years old or over and must sign a waiver to travel with the group. Course may be taken more than once for additional credit.

The Tactile + The Digital: Painting in the New Century

Course No. PTG 21X  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

The focus of this course is the role of Painting in the digital age. Students will use varied media and subjects, traditional and non- traditional, to further develop analytical and expressive means in their painting and creative practices. Students are encouraged to draw from personal interests and from many disciplines to develop projects that will be presented to the class for group critiques. Through slide presentations, gallery visits museum shows, and readings, information will be presented relating to the current art scene in order to further the student’s personal vision, help clarify directions, and explore a variety of formal, conceptual, and technical approaches to painting and image-making. Projects will address, among others, ideas and forms of light and space, color relationships, means and meanings of representation, text and texture, and gender, social and political issues. This course is open to all students with the prerequisite of Intro to Painting or with the permission of the instructor.

Visual Arts: Aesthetics, Style + Content

Course No. VAT 300  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Wulffen | William Lorton

Focuses primarily on the acquisition of creative and technical skills in the context of the development of original ideas and personal style. Studio work will consist of the practical exploration of the relationship between formal, technical, aesthetic, and stylistic issues relative to the personal, and thematic subjects of the student’s own choosing. Relative to this, in the seminar portion of the course the students are given critical, theoretical, and philosophical background to issues surrounding the subjects of style, aesthetics and content. In the studio the students are encouraged to think of their work as an integrative whole consisting of these various components. In this context they are required to engage in independent critical research on topics relevant to their work. The research takes the form of both archival and studio work and is presented in both visual and written form. This course is required for all junior students in Visual Arts. Offered spring.

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Christian Wulffen christianwulffenart01.jpgwulffenchristiannsvcfall20123.jpg

Christian Wulffen

Professor

Christian Wulffen has been an Associate Professor since 2003. He has a solo exhibition on display at Galerie ...more

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