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Story: Sep 26, 2014

CIA's Community Works series focuses on socially engaged art...

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CIA Exhibition: Aug 28, 2014

2014 Faculty Exhibition

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Story: Sep 22, 2014

Television and film writer teaching narrative writing at CIA

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Events: Oct 03, 2014

Lunch On Fridays: Haishan Deng

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Rachel Lamping '14 won first place and the audience favorite award at the California International Animation Festival 2014 for her 2D animation, "Different Not ...

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Story: Sep 16, 2014

CIA Professor Tina Cassara inspires Sculpture Center exhibit...

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Events: Oct 11, 2014

CIA Portfolio Day

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Story: Aug 27, 2014

New residence hall welcomes first-year students in comfort, ...

View details A Creative Life featuring Paul Yanko

Events: Oct 18, 2014 @ William Busta Gallery in Cleveland, OH

A Creative Life featuring Paul Yanko

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Blog: Sep 30, 2014

Bound by Flesh (2012) trailer

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Story: Aug 18, 2014

CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

View details Unruly Engagements Conference

Events: Nov 06, 2014 @ Cleveland Institute of Art in Cleveland, OH

Unruly Engagements Conference

Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

John Cage: His Life, Work, and Influence

Course No. HCS 367X  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christopher Auerbach-Brown

A course on the life and influence of John Cage. The class will detail his history and delve into his musical and artistic output, ideas, and influence on the creative arts today. Significant discussion will be given on his philosophies, aesthetics, innovations, and teachings. The course will also focus on Cage's connections to the visual arts, and how this connection impacted him artistically, while pushing him to formulate ideas that in turn were a significant and continuous influence on the visual arts community. The class will also touch on how Cage was able to make a living on the fringes of a capitalist society while maintaining the values of anarchy and hard work. Regular reading, writing, and listening assignments will be given in class, and students will be expected to create works of art or musical compositions which embody the legacy of John Cage, while pushing the boundaries of their own artistic processes. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Jung + Creativity

Course No. SNS 484  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Adina Davidson

This course will combine a theoretical introduction to Jung with experiential participation in a dream workshop/small group. The theoretical component of the course will provide an overview of Jung's understanding of the human psyche with an emphasis on use of symbols and dreams as the "royal road to the unconscious." Work from the dream workshops is intended to inform the artist's work. Students will be expected (in addition to the usual preparatory reading) to bring dreams weekly and to be willing to apply material from those dreams to their own creative process.

Lit/Lang/Comp Independent Study

Course No. LLC 498  Credits: 3.0

Literature of the Americas

Course No. LLC 388  Credits: 3.0

This course will survey the concurrent but separate developments of the literary traditions of North and South America. Taking Columbus' arrival on Hispaniola as our point of anchor, we will work backward to the Pre-Columbian original narrative forms, and forward through the written records of the complex colonial contexts of the literary art in both Americas. We will also trace the divergent results of the influences of European literature, following in each case the developments of such directions as we can identify in the prose and poetry of the colonial and postcolonial periods of each America. Reading widely and also closely, we will consider how best to trace the parallel emergence of these national literatures, seeking in a juxtaposed study what common literary and extra-literary antecedents and shaping forces the texts in both traditions may reveal. We will also inquire into the nature of the distinctions that must be made between these traditions, and into the impact the differences between these literatures may have of the understanding of what we mean by the phrase "American literature." Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Media Arts + Visual Culture: Installation

Course No. ACD 486  Credits: 3.0
Faculty David Hart | Gary D. Sampson

This course investigates the emergence, prominence and impact of the installation as a new medium in contemporary art. "Media arts" or "new media" include but are not limited to video and experimental film, performance, interactive art, digital media, and especially the installation, which itself embraces a wide range of media. We will focus on the growth of the installation from "environments" in the 1960s into a distinct artistic medium used widely since the 1980s. We will discuss the work of many recognized artists and some less familiar artists from around the world as well as corresponding theories of media within the broader field of visual culture. Using a wide range of installations as examples, particular attention will be given to the implications that new media, especially digital media, have for the creative process and the critical social issues that they raise. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Media Arts + Visual Culture: Interactive Zones

Course No. ACD 487  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gary D. Sampson

What is "interactivity"? A recent publication is titled Total Interaction, but what does that mean? In this course we will look closely at the history, theory, and practice of the interactive as a facet of contemporary art, design, and media culture. We will explore thematic zones or territories of the interactive both real and imagined, including: cybernetic systems, sci-fi and popular culture, visionary design, interactive animations and massive multi-player games, convergent technology, responsive environments, and "A.I." (i.e., artificial intelligence). A previous course in modern and contemporary art or visual culture is assumed for all participants. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Modernism in Latin American Art

Course No. ACD 443X  Credits: 3.0

Whether one considers constructivist sculpture, architectural design, photography, painting, printmaking, or decorative arts, much of the 20th Century art production in Latin America countries is best understood in terms of the struggle to assimilate, redefine, and/or resist styles and concepts of "modernism." In this course we will consider how twentieth-century Latin American art and artists have been interpreted vis-a-vis trends in Europe and the United States, paying particular attention to how issues of cultural and economic exploitation created unique types of personal and national identity. In addition to analyzing the works of such well-known artists as Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, David Alfaro Siqueiros, Jose Clemente Orozco, Wifredo Lam, and Oscar Niemeyer, classes will be arranged thematically to better explore developments in various media and to draw distinctions among the arts of various countries, especially Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, and Brazil. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Museum Studies: Who Owns Art? Issues of Asian Art Collecting

Course No. ACD 480X  Credits: 3.0

In the past five to ten years, issues of ownership and provenance of art works in museums have been hotly debated, with regard to both art world ethics and cultural sensibilities. Some art museums have returned holdings to their original countries and some have firmly maintained their legitimate ownership of objects. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York recently returned to Italy the fifth-century B.C. Euphronios krater. The looting of art has existed in both the past and the present and has not been limited to European countries alone. It has also occurred in Asia—China, India, and other South Asian countries—where the looting has come from internal rather external motivations. How much do we know about such occurrences in Asia? This open-discussion seminar is aimed at exploring issues of ownership in the art and visual culture of Asian countries, and how they are represented and displayed in current European and American contexts. In order to understand this current issue, some historical background on art collecting and museum operations can not be omitted. Participation in readings and discussions are expected in the classroom. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Meet Your Professors view all

Joyce Kessler

Joyce Kessler

Associate Professor of Literature

Dr. Joyce Kessler is Associate Professor of Literature at the Cleveland Institute of Art. She earned her Ph.D....more

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