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Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Basic Theories of Psychology

Course No. SNS 308  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Adina Davidson

This course will offer an overview of the basic theories of psychology and how they apply to human development. We will explore the questions of what motivates people to do what they do. How and why do people change as they grow from infants to adults? How do we develop in our ability to play, to work, to love and to be ethical human beings? The course will cover the major personality theories of Freud and his understanding of the unconscious, Erickson, Jung with his description of the shadows and archetypes in the human mind and Rogers' humanistic psychology as well as learning theories and systems of moral development. The course will also cover the major feminist critiques of these systems. There will be a brief overview of psychological problems such as major depression, schizophrenia, phobias, etc., as well as some methods of treatment.

BFA Thesis Continuation

Course No. GEN 490  Credits: 0.0

Option for students who have completed all course requirements but who require an additional semester to complete their BFA thesis exhibition. Permission of the major department chair required. $500 studio access fee charged.

Censorship, Art, and the Law

Course No. HCS 386  Credits: 3.0

This course will cover the history of censorship in America. We will begin with the language of the First Amendment. We will then study the evolution of the definition of obscenity starting with the Comstack Laws and moving through the current Supreme Court test for determining whether an expression is obscene. We will look at the laws surrounding child pornography as well as hate speech and art that incite violence. For each of these categories of expression, we will discuss anecdotal applications of the First Amendment using artists such as Mapplethorpe, Serrano, Ligon, Zimmerman, Scott, Diana and Finley. While the primary focus of the class will be on government action, we will also look at examples of self censorship by the entertainment industry and public galleries. Finally, we will finish with an overview of the Patriot Act, its current applications and its implications for our future freedom of expression. The question underlying all of the historical context, anecdotal applications and the current law is why do we censor? Are there ever legitimate justifications for censorship and if so, how do we, as a society, draw those lines? In addressing these issues, we will study in depth the feminist anti-pornography movement, excerpts from Susan Sontag's On Photography, and the outcry over music lyrics post Columbine.

Changing Views: Perspectives on African Art

Course No. ACD 385X  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Katherine Flach

Through lectures, readings, and discussions, this seminar will explore important developments in the history of the reception, study, and photography of African art, from the 15th century to present day. An analysis of a number of key publications by pioneering scholars in the field will illustrate the multiple approaches that have been developed to gain insight into Africa’s artistic heritage. Special attention will be devoted to the dialogue between anthropological and art-historical perspectives on the arts of Africa. This seminar will also address the politics and ethics of the acquisition and representation of African art, as well as the methodological challenges connected to their formal and stylistic diversity, and issues of artistic production and patronage.

Children's Literature

Course No. LLC 390X  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Donald Modica

Many adults feel they are familiar with the classic children’s books covered in this course, but actually know only sanitized versions, most produced for the movie screen. This class will examine the original texts of several well-known titles as literature and the fascinating and sometimes disturbing stories behind them. Critical reading, thought, research and writing on these texts will be among the key skills covered. Students will read extensively and discuss what they have read in class, create and deliver peer-evaluated presentations, and write a semester research paper related to the topics of the course. They will view several related films during the semester as well.

Chinese Poetry

Course No. LLC 477  Credits: 3.0

The purpose of this course is two-fold: first, to determine, through intensive readings in translation from the work of representative poets, what characterizes Chinese poetic achievement and, second to articulate our own informed response to these poems. Primary emphasis will be placed on the lyric mode as it develops from its origins in the Book of Songs (compiled c. 600BCE) through its golden age in the T'ang and Sung dynasties. Continuing attention will be paid to the tension between public and private commitment expressed by poets who choose between, attempt to resolve, or transcend these commitments. Topics for special consideration include the classical Chinese language as a vehicle for poetic expression and Chinese calligraphy as an exercise in dynamic proportions, the technical requirements of two major lyric forms, nature as a source of both inspiration and poetic metaphor, and the didactic and individualist traditions of Chinese literary criticism. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

CIA: Our Creative Continuum

Course No. HCS 388X  Credits: 3.0

Students will acquire a working knowledge of the history of the Cleveland Institute of Art--with an emphasis on the diversity of accomplishment among both historical and current CIA faculty and alumni--and will consider whether and, if so, how this information supports their own developing artistic identity and their membership in the CIA community, a "creative continuum" now spanning 130 years (1882-2012). Understanding the history of our school will involve some amount of attention to the history of Cleveland (especially post-1860) and its location in Northeast Ohio, as well as the school's proximity to the Cleveland Museum of Art and other cultural institutions, once the school came to University Circle in 1905. The impact of major 20th-century events like the World Wars and the Great Depression on the school and its community will also be considered. May be applied as Creative Writing Concentration course.

Cinematic Landscapes of Asia

Course No. HCS 387X  Credits: 3.0

This discussion/writing-style course is to explore contemporary films of Asia, focusing on India, China (Taiwan & Hong Kong), & Japan. The films serve as a window of global understanding in culture. Through assigned films, political, social, literary and visual aspects of these nations will be stressed in this course. Mini-lectures will be also provided occasionally to prepare the students in understanding the historical and cultural references in the contexts of contemporary Asian films. For writing assignments, each student is encouraged to self-express and self-identify through viewing the films and sophisticate responses in their writings/reports/critics of the films. The class is divided into 2 components: film viewing and discussion/lectures.

It's not too late to apply

It's not too late to apply

Get started here.

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Nancy McEntee ciaweb04ire10burrenwoods2.jpgmcentee05gardenseriesbookcopy2.jpg

Nancy McEntee

Professor/Chair of Photography + Video

Nancy McEntee is a Professor of Photography and Chair of the Photography + Video department at the Cleveland I...more

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