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Story: Oct 21, 2014

Senior curates exhibition of current students, recent grads ...

View details Adam Markanovic: No Body to Love

CIA Exhibition: Oct 17, 2014

Adam Markanovic: No Body to Love

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Story: Oct 20, 2014

CIA grad transforms Corvette into canvas on wheels

View details Unruly Engagements Conference

Events: Nov 06, 2014 @ Cleveland Institute of Art in Cleveland, OH

Unruly Engagements Conference

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Social: a day ago via Facebook

What does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged? Cleveland Institute of Art invites you to attend an international conference November 6...

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Story: Aug 27, 2014

New residence hall welcomes first-year students in comfort, ...

View details Opening Reception Community Works: Artist as Social Agent

CIA Exhibition: Nov 07, 2014

Opening Reception Community Works: Artist as Social Agent

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Story: Aug 18, 2014

CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

View details Fall 2014 Open House

Events: Nov 15, 2014

Fall 2014 Open House

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Story: Jul 23, 2014

Professor's productive year saw exhibitions, acquisitions, r...

Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Topics in Environmental Science

Course No. SNS 390X  Credits: 3.0

This course explores a broad range of topics that come under the heading of Environmental Science. It will focus on humans and the environment, taking in populations and health, earth resources, water management, food and hunger, biodiversity and sustainable living systems. Applications of these topics to various problems in design such as the design of sustainable cities will be emphasized through term research projects. Fulfills Social or Natural Science liberal arts distribution elective. No prerequisites.

Traditional Tribal Art

Course No. SNS 357  Credits: 3.0

Specific cultures of sub-Saharan Africa are reviewed through their visual arts and ritual. The goal is to understand how each group's history and cultural context influence the creative process (use of symbols, style, media, and technique) and shape the aesthetic response. Some comparative materials from Oceania, India, and Some comparative materials from Oceania, India, and North America are also examined.

Tribe vs. Nation

Course No. SNS 479  Credits: 3.0

The course is an anthropological examination of the impact of technology and "western" industrial development on indigenous populations worldwide. Assumptions posed in the concepts "progress" and "development" are examined by in-depth review of traditional society and culture change among, for instance, the Balinese, ethnic groups in Mali, West Africa and Native American in the United States. Bali's traditional arts, rituals and water temple system of irrigation, Bambara society in Mali and Native American traditional cultures are juxtaposed against the culture change these groups experience with increased global, commercial interdependence. In the 21st century, humankind continues to experience problems of world hunger, population growth, resource depletion, pollution and war. Films, slides and reading review these issues, and peoples, worldwide, to try to consider potential solutions which acknowledge human cultural diversity within the modernization process. An emphasis in the course is a consideration of technological determinism and social choices.

Visual Anthropology

Course No. SNS 321  Credits: 3.0

Visual anthropology is an important growing subfield of cultural anthropology. The course focuses on how anthropologists have used visual media of various kinds, especially ethnographic film, to record, document and study human cultural and social diversity worldwide. A series of ethnographic films, readings and class discussion will explore this method of anthropological data collecting and analysis. As a counterpoint to earlier, popular, western cultural biases in visually "representing" non-western, non-industrial peoples as "romantic," "noble," "savage," "enigmatic," "curiosity," anthropology's film studies sought a stronger objectivity. Did they succeed? Worldwide, indigenous peoples now make extensive use of visual media/communication to reflect on their "contested identities." How has visual anthropology helped in that effort? From the 19th century's still photographs to today's cyberspace, visible culture and visual media interface. The course reviews ethnographic film as part of that communication process. $15 course fee required.

Visual Culture + the Manufacture of Meaning

Course No. ACD 305  Credits: 3.0
Faculty David Hart | Gary D. Sampson | Rita Goodman

This course will introduce students to critical theories and methods of analysis for interpreting contemporary visual art and culture. Topics include: formalism and stylistic analysis; semiotics and structuralism; Marxist theory; biography; psychoanalytic theory; feminist analysis and gender studies; postcolonial theory; post structuralism and postmodernity; and media arts studies (electronic/digital technologies). Select interpretive frameworks employed in the "manufacture of meaning" will be situated historically and discussed fully and critically, using seminal writings. Required for Visual Culture Emphasis. Offered each fall.

Ways of Thought: Confucianism, Taoism, and Zen

Course No. HCS 367  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Allen Zimmerman

This course is an introduction to systems of belief and action in China and Japan. It begins with a critical cross-cultural comparison of Confucianism, Taoism and Ch'an Buddhism in China and Zen Buddhism in Japan, concluding with a comparison between two representative systems, one Eastern and one Western. The aim of this course is twofold: to explore traditional philosophical, religious and psychological perceptions that have influenced life (ideal and otherwise) in China and Japan, and to provide a basis for understanding selected Asian cultures and, through perspectives gained, to reflect upon our own.

Ways of Thought: Hinduism and Buddhism

Course No. HCS 366  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Allen Zimmerman

This two-semester course begins with an introduction to similarities and differences between Eastern and Western systems of belief and action. It proceeds with a critical cross-cultural comparison of Hinduism, Indian and Chinese schools of Buddhism, Taoism in China, and Zen Buddhism in Japan. It concludes with a comparison between two representative systems, one Eastern and one Western. The aim of this course is twofold: to explore traditional philosophical, religious, and psychological perceptions that have influenced life (ideal and otherwise) in India, China and Japan, and to provide a basis for understanding selected Asian cultures and, through perspectives gained, to reflect upon our own.

Woman's Words

Course No. LLC 424  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Joyce Kessler

This course is designed to outline the contributions of women to the origins and development of the novel genre in English and American literature from 1688 to the present time. It will focus on discovery of the relationships between the earliest women's literary production and the literature written by the women of this moment. It will inquire into the areas of race and social class as they are directly relevant to (or feature as tropes within) the literature comprising our reading list. It also introduces some of the basic theoretical questions that feminist scholarship has raised in connection with women's writing during these periods. Through selected readings, research, and critical discussion, members of this class will become familiar with modern women's literature, its social/historical contexts, and some of the feminist critical approaches through which it has been considered. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Meet Your Professors view all

Joyce Kessler

Joyce Kessler

Associate Professor of Literature

Dr. Joyce Kessler is Associate Professor of Literature at the Cleveland Institute of Art. She earned her Ph.D....more

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