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Academics . Liberal Arts . Courses

Liberal Arts Courses

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG231.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students as an elective. Required for Junior Painting Majors.

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG331.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students.

Ptg & The Photograph: From Delacroix to Richter

Course No. PTG431.1  Credits: 3.0
Prerequisite(s) Intro to Painting: Painting History: 1828-Present

Painters going back as far as Renaissance have used devices such as the camera obscura to produce two-dimensional depictions of the three dimensional world. With the invention of photography in 1839, artists were liberated from the demands of reproducing naturalistic appearances. This course explores the relationship between the photographic and painting; the effect that the birth of photography has had on the history, and the current state of painting. A primary question to be considered is what are the strategies of Painting in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction? How has photography and mechanical reproduction influenced Painting? We will look at artists as varied as Delacroix, Courbet, Warhol, Rosenquist, Tuymans, Richter, Struth, Gursky, among others. Readings will include readings from authors such as Sontag, Benjamin, and Barthes. This course is open to all non-Painting major students as an elective.

Apr. 1: Financial Aid Night at CIA

Apr. 1: Financial Aid Night at CIA

Register here.

Meet Your Professors view all

Diane Lichtenstein

Diane Lichtenstein

Professor

Diane Lichtenstein MA and PhD, University of Wisconsin, Madison, is a professor in the Liberal Arts Department...more

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