share this

It's not too late to apply
Get started here.
Share This Search
Jewelry + Metals

Academics . Jewelry + Metals . Courses

Jewelry + Metals Courses

Enamel in the Public Realm

Course No. MET 250-350-450  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

The use of enamel for public, community based, collaborative, or interactive art is the focus of this course. Demonstrations will support beginning to advanced level students and will vary based on needs to complete individual projects. The emphasis for beginning students will be on the use of enamel on the two-dimensional surface. Students with metal forming experience may explore three-dimensional forms in combination with enamel.

Enamel: Image, Surface, Relief

Course No. MET 245  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

Fused glass (enamel) to metal is the focus of this course. Drawing and painting skills will transcend graphite, paper, oil and canvas to molten glass on metal. Transparent, opaque, liquid and dry enamels will be introduced. Experimental to traditional processes in the medium will be covered. Photographic and digitally produced images are options for resists for the acid etching process. The linear aspects of cloisonné will be considered through the fusion of formed silver and copper wires into the enamel surface.

Fashion-Jewelry-Accessories

Course No. MET 271-371-471  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

Fashion has the power to transcend the mundane, to offer new and novel experiences, to transform the wearer, to empower and provoke, and to reflect and record the times in which we live. As artists and designers we live in a culture of unprecedented access to information, new ideas, materials, and technologies. Fashion-Jewelry-Accessories is designed to focus on the changing landscape of art and design, where we will examine history, concepts, design practices, materials and technologies toward fashion jewelry and accessories. Varied materials and techniques from self-directed exploration to advanced studio technologies will supplement the course to challenge conceptual growth, facilitate design, and present new means of fabrication. “Challenges” are presented to afford students the opportunity to conduct research and explore their own directions. Readings, essays, and discussion offer the integrated seminar experience. The course includes visiting artists/ designers, a field trip, presentations, and demonstrations to support individual directions. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Intro to Jewelry and Metals

Course No. MET 249  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss | Matthew Hollern

Work in this studio involves the field of jewelry and metalsmithing, its history, contemporary issues and activities, and the use and understanding of materials and processes. As a medium, metal presents more variables and potential than any other material. It can serve to produce sound, light, heat, motion, to present color, texture and form, to store and release energy, and provide strength and durability, all of which increase the options in your work. An introduction to the field of jewelry and metals includes the foundation techniques, skills, and technologies necessary to create jewelry and objects of material culture. The course includes extensive presentations, demonstrations, technical exercises and assignments, discussions, and critiques. Throughout the semester we explore the use of metal as a medium for artistic expression. A strong emphasis is placed on your ability to address and apply design principles, aesthetic considerations, and conceptual content to achieve a visual statement. Required of first semester Jewelry + Metals majors. Open to all electives. Offered fall.

Jewelry + Metals: Advanced Projects

Course No. MET 253-353-453  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

The course is designed to examine concepts and technologies of the field, and pursue work of individual direction. Various advanced studio practices and techniques will supplement the course to challenge conceptual growth, facilitate design, and present new means of fabrication. Subjects are presented to direct students to conduct research and examine their own position. The course includes demonstrations and presentations to support individual directions. Ongoing discussions and readings are an integral part of the course. Open to Jewelry and Metals majors and electives with instructor's permission.

Jewelry + Metals: Alternative Materials

Course No. MET 263-363-463  Credits: 3.0

The limitless possibilities of materials are investigated and applied to create wearable objects. These materials are explored for their conceptual potential and the capacity they hold as related to design elements for production. Students reinterpret and remake materials. Self-directed work and projects relating to the topic are presented throughout the semester. Reading, research, and critiques are an integral part of the class. Slides, images, and actual works supplement the course. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Art + Machine

Course No. MET 255-355-455  Credits: 3.0

An intermediate and advanced level course designed to provide new opportunities to discuss and explore the historical and contemporary roll of tools, machines, and technology in the art and design. New technologies and materials provide an exciting range of possibilities in models, molds, and parts for jewelry and object making. The course will address the practices, concepts and technologies of tool making, machine tool processes, and CAD/CAM + 3D printing. Students develop and apply new skill sets to develop and create work of individual direction. The course includes 3D modeling, rendering, and output to the department's (2) devices, (CNC - computer numerical control) milling machine and the Solidscape 3D "wax printer", as well as the Institute's FDM (fused deposition modeling - "plastic printer") and service bureaus. Readings, essays, and discussion offer the integrated seminar experience. Visiting artists, a field trip to a service bureau, and presentations supplement the course. Open to Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

Jewelry + Metals: Casting

Course No. MET 268-368-468  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

As a basic technology in the jewelry and metals field, casting provides the opportunity to explore complex and dynamic form, surface and texture, the organic and geometric language. Technologies and materials from ancient to the cutting edge provide new and exciting possibilities for models, molds, parts. The course will address concepts and technologies of basic waxwork and model making, CAD/CAM, and casting processes to challenge students to apply new techniques and technologies to create work that remains unique to their direction. From fundamental wax carving and found objects to 3D modeling and output to the Solidscape™ 3D wax printer and the CNC milling machine, the course will cultivate new skills and opportunities for the creation of new work. Vacuum, centrifugal, gravity, and rubber mold casting are addressed to provide a range of opportunities for tangible objects. A wide variety of metals, plastic resins, and rubber provide endless possibilities. Readings, essays, and discussion offer the integrated seminar experience. Visiting artists, field trips, and presentations will supplement the activity in the department. Open to sophomore Jewelry + Metals majors and all electives.

It's not too late to apply

It's not too late to apply

Get started here.

Meet Your Professors view all

Kathy Buszkiewicz kathybuszkiewiczart01.jpgkathybuszkiewiczart02.jpg

Kathy Buszkiewicz

Professor

Kathy Buszkiewicz has exhibited throughout the world, and her work is represented in many collections. She tra...more

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

Read More

Support CIA

Show the world creativity matters: make a gift to the annual fund.

Read More

SPECTRUM CIA 2015

Save the date. Four celebration events.

Read More

Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.