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Cinematheque
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Apr 17, 2014

Design major gets zombie's reception at her former school

View details CIA's Traveling Sketchbooks make a last stop at MOCA

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Mar 15, 2014 @ MOCA Cleveland in Cleveland, OH

CIA's Traveling Sketchbooks make a last stop at MOCA

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Apr 16, 2014

CIA's 'focused workshop environment' paid off

View details Dinner by Design – Art of the Table, and a runway show

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Mar 28, 2014

Dinner by Design – Art of the Table, and a runway show

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a day ago via Facebook

The Cleveland Institute of Art wishes you a happy spring. Artwork by Christina Blaschke '15

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Apr 15, 2014

Students win $11,000 in Dealer Tire art competition

View details The Accident: Recent Work by Nicky Nodjoumi

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Mar 28, 2014

The Accident: Recent Work by Nicky Nodjoumi

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Apr 11, 2014

Romanian visiting artist brings new perspective to CIA

View details 2014 Spring Illustration + Animation Show

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Apr 22, 2014

2014 Spring Illustration + Animation Show

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Apr 15, 2014

4/17-19: Benicio Del Toro in Jimmy P, Hitchcock's To Catch A Thief & more!

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Aug 20, 2013

CIA named one of the "Best in the Midwest"

View details 2014 Spring Design Show

cia exhibition

Apr 22, 2014 @ Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland in Cleveland, OH

2014 Spring Design Show

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Systems Drawing

Course No. DRG360/460  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christian Wulffen | Lane Cooper

This course will investigate the means by which various systems of drawing and representation function as methods of communication. How do historical, cultural and social contexts frame an artistÕs ability to send messages through their work? And, like in a game of telephone, in any system of communication it is inevitable that potential problems may occur- misunderstandings, errors, and falsehoods. Can these absorbed into the content of the work? Illusionistic, abstract, allegorical, diagrammatic, mathematical and idiosyncratic systems of drawing and representation will be investigated through this course, through studio practice, readings, critique and in-class discussion. Required of all Junior Drawing Majors.

The Artist & Social Practice

Course No. FIB267F/367F/467F  Credits: 3.0
Faculty José Carlos Teixeira

This course explores a realm of artistic endeavor usually apart from the gallery system and the art market, where the artist applies his/her talents to questions directly related to community, social responsibility, and political activism.

While looking critically at recent manifestations in relational and participatory practices - as well as learning about their historical context and interdependence with other fields - students will work within a greater social context, applying their skills to pressing issues (such as ecology, urban decay, poverty, discrimination, violence, and global abuses of the military-industrial complex, to name a few).

The pedagogical approach will be to present projects realized by other artists who have worked in these areas, and to be able to contextualize these practices as the result/reflection of our current economic, political, and cultural situation(s) - both nationally and internationally.

Students will research issues that are of greater concern to them individually, and present them to the whole class. This will be followed by in-depth discussion around problem-solving, efficacy of action, and aesthetic materialization. Projects will then be developed and implemented throughout the semester.

The Artist + Social Practice

Course No. VAT267/367/467  Credits: 3.0

This course explores a realm of artistic endeavor apart from the Western canon and the gallery art system. As such, students will work within the greater social context, applying their skills to pressing issues such as urban decay and poverty, ecology (brown fields, waste, pollution) violence, and other issues stemming from contradictions between the wants and needs of the individual and the wants and needs of the greater society. Histories of artists working in these arenas will provide a starting point and a model for student work. Each student will research issues that are of personal concern, present their findings to the class. This will be followed by discussions around problem solving and efficacy of action. Projects will then be developed and implemented.

The Artist Book Now: Narrative and Form

Course No. PRI332.1  Credits: 0.0
Faculty Jennifer Craun

This studio course is for students interested in producing sequentially developed imagery via linear book structures. Historical examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library's artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Due to technological advancements over the last century artists now have a variety of media with which to explore output of book projects. The class will expose students to the nature and potential of different book structures as well as a variety of materials. The course will heighten the student's ability to utilize the interaction of sequenced content -- the act of turning pages-- to express the continuity of an idea flowing through a continuum. Students realize the potential of narrative, sequence, and pacing, together with the importance of combining word and image. Note: Open Elective. Required for Fourth Year Print Majors. 3 credits.

The Artist Book Now: Narrative and Form

Course No. PRI432  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jennifer Craun

This studio course is for students interested in producing sequentially developed imagery via linear book structures. Historical examples and contemporary developments regarding the evolution of the artist book are examined through texts, through the use of our library's artist book collection, in discussion, and during critiques. Due to technological advancements over the last century artists now have a variety of media with which to explore output of book projects. The class will expose students to the nature and potential of different book structures as well as a variety of materials. The course will heighten the student's ability to utilize the interaction of sequenced content -- the act of turning pages-- to express the continuity of an idea flowing through a continuum. Students realize the potential of narrative, sequence, and pacing, together with the importance of combining word and image. Note: Open Elective. Required for Fourth Year Print Majors. 3 credits.

The Body: Tradition, Transformation, Transgression

Course No. ACD458  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Rita Goodman

This seminar-style course will explore one of the most important themes of twentieth-century visual art: the body (male and female). We will discuss a complex range of ideas and values associated with the nude (and naked) body as it has been re-presented in 20th c. photography; painting; sculpture/installation; performance and body art; and video. While the "great tradition" of the nude will be introduced, the course will focus on art produced since the 1950s (from the late modern to the postmodern era). Among other topics, we will study the visual body as a representational site for the self; for erotic desire; for the political position of women; and for formal experimentation. We will look at art that presents bodies which are very much outside tradition: i.e., bodies that are sick, decaying, dying, dead, aging, obese, androgynous, deformed, etc. Topics and terms of analysis will include: the traditional nude; feminist critiques of sexism; voyeurism; "exploitation," "obscenity," and censorship; objectification (gaze theory) sexuality; the nude self-portrait and portrait; parody and quotation; the female nude and modernism; Kenneth Clark's nude-naked (ideal-real) dichotomy; identity and performance; and formal aestheticizing of the body. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

The Contemporary Portrait

Course No. PHV228/328/428  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Nancy McEntee
Prerequisite(s) Fundamentals of Studio Lighting | Photo I: Mechanics of Digital + Darkroom Photography

This course is an exploration of contemporary approaches to portraiture and its relation to the historical photographic portrait. Analysis of both simple and complex photographic identities and real and invented realities are investigated. Photographic assignments, readings and discussions lead to a better understanding of the student’s individual approach to the portrait and their unique relationship with the subject. Practical applications of Photographic portraiture will also be discussed. Open Studio elective 3 credits. Prerequisites: PHV 295 Photo I: Mechanics of Digital + Film Photography; PHV 292 Fundamentals of Studio lighting, or Instructor signature.

The Extended Body

Course No. FIB320/420  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara

This class will address the amplification and expansion of the body into space and the role of the senses in perception. Studio work will begin with a consideration of how we understand the world though touch, sight, smell/taste, the sense of hearing, and kinesthetic perception supplied by muscles of the body. Costume, object-generated performance and social sculpture are examples of the directions taken by students. Media, processes and techniques are open and will be based on individual interests, knowledge and skill sets. Open elective. Required Junior year FMS Majors. 3 credits.

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

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Pre-College Program

Sharpen your artistic skills at CIA's Pre-College Program this summer.

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Nicky Nodjoumi and Dinner by Design exhibitions

CIA welcomes spring with two very different shows opening on March 28.

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Cores + Connections

Learn more about CIA's proven method for academic and professional excellence.