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Drawing as Image, Process, and Plan

Course No. DRG 21X-31X-41X  Credits: 3.0

Initial projects of the course will focus on the construction of a drawing utilizing a variety of sources including: observation, historical reference, photographs, digital images, and the imagination. Discussion will focus on contextualizing the drawing as object, locating it through the study of pertinent theory and history. In further projects students will consider the drawing as part of a larger process in developing 2-D images through a variety of media. Important to this discussion will be concerns of composition, scale, and media and their relationship to concept and content. Students will then research artists who have utilized drawing as a planning tool for film, sculpture, and other media. The focus of these projects will be on how the drawing aids the artist in conceptualizing a form in space and time.

Drawing Beyond Observation

Course No. DRG 221-321-421  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Christian Wulffen | Michael Meier

This course will explore strategies for representation beyond direct perception, moving past the use of the traditional still life, landscape, or model as subject. How can a drawing describe the world that is beyond the range of our common visual observations? Different approaches to drawing, including free-association, metaphor, and mapping are explored to help define and circumvent personal barriers. Required for junior Drawing majors. Offered fall.

Drawing for Animation

Course No. ANIM 220  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lincoln Adams

An essential course for anyone who is interested in visual storytelling. This course will teach students how to draw ideas, actions, and gestures that effectively communicate a story. Students will draw from live models in costumes, animals in motion, and create characters that capture storytelling poses. An emphasis will be placed on exaggeration, silhouetting, line of action, balance, and gesture: all of which are needed to communicate a character’s attitude and story. This course is highly recommended for animators and illustrators. Offered fall.

Drawing I

Course No. FND 117  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Anthony Ingrisano | Christian Wulffen | Gretchen Goss | Michael Meier | Peter Green | Sarah Kabot | Terry Clark

Primary goals of Drawing 1 focus on core drawing concepts; basic methods, tools and materials; and an introduction into the language of mark making. Composition and visual analysis are emphasized through drawing from observation, including perspective theories as they relate to objects and environments. Students utilize observational information to develop a broad range of manual and perceptual skills and to develop an ability to translate the three-dimensional world into two dimensions. Students are challenged to develop a strong drawing practice through in-class work, out of class assignments, and in on-going drawing/sketch books. Offered fall.

Drawing II

Course No. FND 118  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Barbara Chira | Christian Wulffen | Douglas Sanderson | Gretchen Goss | Jimmy Kuehnle | Michael Meier | Sarah Kabot | Terry Clark
Prerequisite(s) Drawing I

Drawing 2 continues to build on basic drawing concepts, methods, and materials that were introduced in the previous semester. Emphasis for Drawing 2 is on the human figure, with observational drawing from the live model in the classroom, and weekly out-of-class drawing assignments which explore various figurative concepts. Special attention is given to composition, visual analysis, and expression through drawing from observation, including perspective theories as they relate to objects and environments. The language of mark making is also introduced in a range of drawing media. Students develop a personal approach through the use of drawing/sketchbooks. Students are challenged to incorporate skills and theories into resolved drawings; to think critically regarding the content and process of drawing; to develop confidence when experimenting with new media; and to develop vocabulary in order to be an active, informed participant in class discussions and critiques. Prerequisite: FND117 Drawing I. Offered spring.

Drawing Major Day: Drawing in Context

Course No. DRG 415M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Ingrisano

What provides the context for a contemporary drawing? Is it the graphic novel or a classical form of figurative representation? Does it find its place in the space of the gallery or on the street? Students will explore the ways in which form and style contribute to the content of their work. Projects are student driven with an emphasis on working with each student to develop his or her ideas through research, exploration, and experimentation. Museum and gallery excursions and visiting artists are regularly scheduled to expose students to historical and contemporary artwork and practice. Required for senior Drawing majors.

Drawing Thesis

Course No. DRG 430  Credits: 3.0

Building on understandings of narrative, systems and context, students will work towards the creation of a final BFA thesis. Through working in the studio, students will build a coherent understanding of the process, content, and context for their artwork, as drawing. Students will produce works in response to topics and through critique, readings and discussion come to an understanding of how they function in their own work. Required of all senior drawing majors and open as an elective with the prerequisite of Illusionism or through permission of instructor or Drawing chair.

Drawing: Images: Series, Episodes + Time

Course No. DRG 27X-37X-47X  Credits: 3.0

Through the many permutations of the discipline such as drawing as narrative, drawing as process, and drawing as animation, the concept of the sequential will be explored. The course will include readings, in-class discussion and critiques, as well as an examination of the practices of diverse artists including William Kentridge, Matthew Ritchie, Judith Bernstein, William Anastasi, and Marjane Satrapi. Assignments will be given that address various methods of describing time through the medium. This course is open to all majors and is cross-listed with Visual Arts.

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