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Story: Oct 21, 2014

Senior curates exhibition of current students, recent grads ...

View details Adam Markanovic: No Body to Love

CIA Exhibition: Oct 17, 2014

Adam Markanovic: No Body to Love

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Story: Oct 20, 2014

CIA grad transforms Corvette into canvas on wheels

View details Lunch On Fridays: Word!

Events: Oct 31, 2014

Lunch On Fridays: Word!

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Social: about 14 hours ago via Facebook

Tomorrow, put on your best costume and join us for Lunch On Fridays, CIA's free lunchtime lecture series. In this edition, authors and artists will present the ...

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Story: Sep 22, 2014

Television and film writer teaching narrative writing at CIA

View details Unruly Engagements Conference

Events: Nov 06, 2014 @ Cleveland Institute of Art in Cleveland, OH

Unruly Engagements Conference

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Story: Aug 27, 2014

New residence hall welcomes first-year students in comfort, ...

View details Opening Reception Community Works: Artist as Social Agent

CIA Exhibition: Nov 07, 2014

Opening Reception Community Works: Artist as Social Agent

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Story: Aug 18, 2014

CIA again named to "Best in the Midwest" list

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Science Fiction Writing Workshop

Course No. LLC 210W  Credits: 3.0

The genre (or sub-genre) of science fiction may, on one level, be seen as a variety of Romanticism, as an extended collective response to features of modernity, specifically scientific discoveries and innovations, as well as elements of the Industrial and technological revolutions. Science fiction, in its astonishing number of permutations, has filled a vast canvas of imaginative possibility, discovering a range of responses and forms that range from the dystopian, pessimistic, even nihilistic, to the utopian. We hear and see, in the voices and imaginations of different science fiction writers and artists, warnings and celebrations, but at the bottom, questionings of what it means to be human and of what kinds of possibilities may lay before us. Science fiction is also a remarkably popular genre; it's vitally manifested in books, television shows, films, toys, games. In this class we will investigate some of the space(s), both literal and metaphorical, that science fiction (and popular ideas of science) offer to the imagination. The course's center, however, is the students' own writing and their own ideas, and will be conducted in workshop format, with relatively brief lectures by the instructor presenting relevant literary, historical, theoretical and biographical backgrounds and contexts. During the semester, students will present two to three original works-in-progress (either creative or critical) to the class, distributing photocopies of their work a week in advance to the members of the class and to the instructor. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Screenwriting

Course No. LLC 318  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Shelley Bloomfield Costa

What is a spec script, a slugline, a smash cut? What's the difference between montage and a series of shots, and why does the screenwriter need to know? One script page averages how many minutes of onscreen film time? In addition to the demands of just plain good storytelling, writing for film entails expressing everything about the story visually, which gives visual artists an advantage in adapting to the demands of the form. It is the screenwriter's job to put all of the sights, sounds and speeches on the page, while still leaving room for interpretation by the filmmakers. In this course we will discuss the elements of good storytelling, study the screenplays of Pulp Fiction and Chocolat, and write a short screenplay formatted to conform to industry standards. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

SCU/VAT: Installation: The Empire of the Senses

Course No. VAT45X.1  Credits: 3.0

Installation art breaks away from the singular object, the pedestal and the detached viewer. Through this work, it is possible to engage the viewer using all the senses. This studio course will provide the opportunity to work with materials and methods not traditionally associated with the visual arts. Lectures and research will focus on perception—how we understand the world through sight, smell/ taste, the sense of hearing and kinesthetic cues received from the body. The information provided will provide an environment of concepts to support and challenge the student’s work . Students will develop installations in line with their interests and concerns. Open Elective. 3 credits.

Sculpture + Expanded Media

Course No. SCU231  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara | Jimmy Kuehnle

This course provides an introduction to sculpture and expanded media by examining the methodologies, materials, history, traditions,and cultural context of sculpture and expanded media in contemporary art.. The class will include wood construction and textile-based fabrication processes, moldmaking and casting relevant to a range of materials, basic metalworking techniques such as cutting and welding, and will introduce the student to the use of time-based media present in contemporary sculpture. Required for sophomore Sculpture majors. Open to all students as an elective. Offered fall.

Sculpture Special Topics: Sculpture Multimedia: Space to Time - Linear/Non-Linear

Course No. SCU341.1  Credits: 0.0

This course is designed to explore materials (traditional and non-traditional) and ideas of sculpture outside of the formats usually associated with it. The goal is for students to push the boundaries of sculpture as installation art, video, and film. Projects will deal with visibility and invisibility, ephemerality, sound, time, gender, and social issues in relation to sculpture, and will use indoor and outdoor site-specific or performance-oriented formats. Fundamental aspects of this course are the analysis, expression, experimentation, and deconstruction of existing values and the reconstruction of one's own relation to popular culture, theory and other fields of interest (such as science, music, philosophy, etc.). 3 credits.

Sculpture Special Topics: Sculpture Multimedia: Space to Time - Linear/Non-Linear

Course No. SCU441.1  Credits: 0.0

This course is designed to explore materials (traditional and non-traditional) and ideas of sculpture outside of the formats usually associated with it. The goal is for students to push the boundaries of sculpture as installation art, video, and film. Projects will deal with visibility and invisibility, ephemerality, sound, time, gender, and social issues in relation to sculpture, and will use indoor and outdoor site-specific or performance-oriented formats. Fundamental aspects of this course are the analysis, expression, experimentation, and deconstruction of existing values and the reconstruction of one's own relation to popular culture, theory and other fields of interest (such as science, music, philosophy, etc.). 3 credits.

Sculpture Special Topics: The Architecture of Space

Course No. SCU235/335/435  Credits: 3.0

The primary focus of this course is the investigation of interior and exterior spaces as defined by preexisting architectural elements and structures. Students are encouraged to use a wide variety of materials in the construction of installations. This course focuses on the finite conditions of architectural settings while maintaining a responsive attitude to the possibilities suggested by these site-specific explorations particularly in terms of the various narratives embedded within a given location. Students will be expected to construct on average two different works alternating between interior and exterior spaces over the course of the semester. Students will also be expected to participate in discussions centering on readings dealing with the theoretical concerns of Architecture, its impact on sculpture and its ability to both define and/or modify conditions of site-specificity and installation as with regard to sculpture and sculptural-based work.

Sculpture Special Topics: The Architecture of Space

Course No. SCU335.1  Credits: 0.0

The primary focus of this course is the investigation of interior and exterior spaces as defined by preexisting architectural elements and structures. Students are encouraged to use a wide variety of materials in the construction of installations. This course focuses on the finite conditions of architectural settings while maintaining a responsive attitude to the possibilities suggested by these site-specific explorations particularly in terms of the various narratives embedded within a given location. Students will be expected to construct on average two different works alternating between interior and exterior spaces over the course of the semester. Students will also be expected to participate in discussions centering on readings dealing with the theoretical concerns of Architecture, its impact on sculpture and its ability to both define and/or modify conditions of site-specificity and installation as with regard to sculpture and sculptural-based work. 3 credits.

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

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Community Works

Visiting artists, exhibitions, conference and symposia exploring socially engaged art.

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Uptown Residence Hall

Check out the new student digs.

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Cores + Connections

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