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Creative Resistance: Media Art in the Social Sphere

Course No. SEM 340  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jimmy Kuehnle | Sarah Paul

This studio course will introduce students to the process and strategies of integrating social activism with media art. Through reading and discussion, the course will establish the historical and theoretical context of tactical media, hacktivism, and other media-based protest arts. We’ll look at artists’ use of a variety of media--including the news media, the Internet, locative media, surveillance technologies, genetic modification, gaming and more — to implement social commentary and criticism. Offered fall.

Creative Writing

Course No. LLC 393  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Shelley Bloomfield Costa | Susan Grimm

This course will give students the opportunity to explore the three essential genres of creative writing in a practicum setting. Study and practice will center on basic analytic methods for reading and basic inventive methods for writing short fiction, poetry, and dramatic narratives. Course assignments will include exercises in writing the short story, including the short graphic narrative; various poetic forms such as the sonnet, the villanelle, and the free verse poem; and variants of the short dramatic narrative such as the screen treatment, the story board, and the short film script. Creative Writing can be taken to satisfy either required Junior/Senior Writing-Intensive credit or Open Elective Liberal Arts credit. It will allow students who are planning visual arts careers involving writing (i.e., illustration, film, and video) to develop the basic critical and writing performance skills necessary for their professional advancement. Students who may be considering the Creative Writing Concentration program are strongly urged to take this course during their Sophomore year. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Creative Writing Concentration: Body of Work

Course No. LLC 415  Credits: 1.5

Required of seniors pursuing the Creative Writing Concentration. Not open as an elective. Fall and spring semesters required. 1.5 credits each semester.

Creative Writing Concentration: Body of Work Continuation

Course No. LLC 415C  Credits: 1.5

Required of seniors pursuing the Creative Writing Concentration. Not open as an elective. Fall and spring semesters required. 1.5 credits each semester.

Creativity + Taoism

Course No. HCS 300  Credits: 3.0

This interdisciplinary course explores the ground from which, in the Chinese Taoist philosophic view, all great creativity springs. The purpose is two-fold: first, to investigate and achieve an understanding of the Taoist world view through readings of primary texts such as the "Tao Te Ching" and the "Chuangtzu," and selected works from the Ch'an (Zen) tradition. Second, we proceed to examine the Taoist and Ch'an perceptions are applied to and affect the creation of the art object in traditional China, primarily represented by selections from Chinese poetry. Appropriate attention will also be paid to intended relationships between painting and poetry, occurring when poems are inscribed directly on paintings to create an aesthetic whole. Here the notion that "visual" and "literary" experiences are somehow mutually exclusive will be challenged. We read such poets as T'so Ch'ien, Wang Wei, Su Tung-p'o and Han Shan, and we look at paintings by such artists as Mu Ch'i, Mi Fei, Shih T'ao and Ni Tsan. Students are encouraged to connect and contrast Taoist assumptions and themes with their own knowledge and experiences as developing artists. May be applied as Creative Writing Concentration course.

Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 241-341-441  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Culture, Conflict, and Syncretism

Course No. LLC 441  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Olatubosun Ogunsanwo

This course is primarily concerned with the dialectic of multiculturality and multidimensionality. Africans under colonialism, like most of the Third World at one time or the other, were confronted with the overwhelming encroachment of European/Western/Christian ways of life and thought alien to them. Yet Africa still struggles up till today to preserve its integrity, its intrinsic identity, notably in the form of neotraditionalism. This vortex of cultural interplay in Africa has led to socio- cultural phenomenon described as deracination or “the crisis in the soul” (Achebe) or “triple heritage/cultural accommodation” (Ali Mazrui). In postmodernist terms, it has led to syncretism. The course will also explore analogies from the multidimensional art, mainly from the interchange between visual and literary arts. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Design + Craft in Modern Culture

Course No. ACD 462  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gary D. Sampson

This course is an introduction to graphic and three-dimensional design from the Industrial Revolution to the present. We will examine modern and contemporary artists, styles, and objects across the design and craft disciplines, including finely crafted furniture and other objects designed for public and private spaces (architectural details and ornamentation, wallpaper, textiles, lamps, kitchenware, etc.); decorative objects such as ceramics, metalwork, and glass; objects of mass production and consumer culture (cars, trains, cameras, corporate and residential furnishings, electronic goods, etc.); art posters, private press books and illustrations, and innovative forms of communication graphics. Special consideration will be given to the social and cultural meanings of objects, issues related to the design and craft fields as professional occupations, and the art historical and theoretical relationships of the various design and craft disciplines beyond medium (material) specific concerns. Visual Culture Emphasis course. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

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