share this

It's not too late to apply
Get started here.
Share This Search
Continuing Education

Academics . Courses

Courses Courses

Communication Skills: Transportation 1.2

Course No. IND 288T  Credits: 3.0

This course is an extension of Fall Communication Skills and will focus on the development of effective visual communication for transportation design. An emphasis will be placed on exploring and communicating ideas through sketching, rendering, orthographic drawing, modeling and verbal/visual presentation. Digital communication tools and techniques will be introduced, including the use of digital drawing tablets. Studio time will include demos, one-day assignments, work time and one-on-one instruction. Coursework is designed to align with projects in Transportation Design. Prerequisite: Communications Skills 1.1. Required of sophomore Transportation Track students. Offered spring.

Community Projects

Course No. ILL 390  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Larry O'Neal

Students will illustrate and provide art and production services for individual clients as well as for organizations in a professional studio setting. The course emphasizes the student's development of problem-solving, meeting client demands, communication skills, organization and effective time management, proper preparation of artwork for reproduction, teamwork and collaboration - all specific to the marketplace as an introduction to real-life challenges. Offered fall and spring.

Community Projects: Illustration + Product

Course No. ILL 389  Credits: 3.0

Students will illustrate and provide art and production services for individual clients as well as for organizations in a professional studio setting. The course emphasizes the student’s development of problem-solving, meeting client demands, communication skills, organization and effective time management, proper preparation of artwork for reproduction, teamwork and collaboration—all specific to the marketplace as an introduction to real-life challenges. Offered fall and spring.

Community Projects: Illustration + Production Workshop

Course No. EP 389  Credits: 3.0

Students will illustrate and provide art and production services for individual clients as well as for organizations in a professional studio setting. The course emphasizes the student’s development of problem solving, meeting client demands, communication skills, organization and effective time management, proper preparation of artwork for reproduction, teamwork and collaboration—all specific to the marketplace as an introduction to real-life challenges. Required of junior Illustration majors. Open to electives with instructor’s permission. Offered fall and spring

Concept Development I

Course No. ANIM 201-301  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Scalmato | James Mravec | Lincoln Adams | Suzanne McGinness

A core requirement to learn digital painting in motion, scene design, character development, technical direction, and related animation production pipeline standards for developing animated stories, shorts, films, and animated cinematography. This course examines the media pro-education requirements for animation students in applied professional studios. This course serves to develop the animator's core mechanics and vocabulary in the broad areas of animation integrated workflow (story conception, storyboarding, animatics, motion studies, character flow and design, scene, set, and props (look artists), technical direction, and summary of post-production flow) to meet industry expectations and professional output. Offered spring.



Conceptual Art

Course No. ACD 483X  Credits: 3.0

This theme-based art history course is designed to give students an in-depth, semester-long investigation into the art movements and ideas that informed Conceptual ArtÕs development in the 1960s and 1970s as well as its impact on contemporary art making in the decades that followed. This course will cover, but not be limited to, the so-called heyday of Conceptual Art in the 1960s and 1970s, a focus on which would otherwise reinforce the traditional modernist art historical framework that defined styles in part by limiting them to a specific time period. Significant time in the class will be devoted to investigating examples of conceptually-informed art created in the 1980s, 1990s and the early 21st century, underscoring the impact of Conceptual ArtÕs legacy for art, craft and design today. The course will investigate the philosophies that informed conceptual art that allowed artists to problematize the conditions and encounters with art; the conventions of its visuality, and the circumstances of its production. Visual Culture Emphasis course.

Contemporary African + African American Literature

Course No. LLC 359  Credits: 3.0

Today a good deal of third-world literature in particular expressed in many vital respects postmodern historical awareness of the parmountcy of the power relations hidden behind political, economic and social institutions and structures both nationally and internationally. With particular emphasis on political economy, this course will examine how this literature re-contextualizes such critical sociological questions as: What's traditionalism? What's modernization? The African-American texts highlight African-American socio-economic challenges today, dating back to Emancipation/Reconstruction, alongside their efforts at socio-cultural self-definitions. Fulfills Humanities/Cultural Studies distribution requirement. Creative Writing Concentration course.

Contemporary Art: Critical Directions

Course No. ACD493.1  Credits: 3.0

Traditionally art historians have focused on the history of European art. But recently there has been great interest in art of other cultures. Is a history of world art possible? And if so, what form might it take? This course explores that question. We read Richard Wollheim's aesthetic focused on European art. And then we discuss James Elkins, Stories of Art, which attempts to imagine a history of world art. We then pursue our investigation by reading recent accounts of Islamic art (Oleg Grabar, The Meditation of Ornament), Indian art (Partha Mitter, Indian Art), and Chinese art (Craig Clunas, Art in China). This class requires a good deal of reading. It does not presuppose any prior knowledge of art history or aesthetics. Three papers, two short ones and one long one will be required. There is no final exam. Visual Culture Emphasis course. 3 credits.

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

Read More

Support CIA

Show the world creativity matters: make a gift to the annual fund.

Read More

SPECTRUM CIA 2015

Save the date. Four celebration events.

Read More

Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.