share this

It's not too late to apply
Get started here.
Share This Search
Drawing

Academics . Drawing . Courses

Drawing Courses

100 Drawings

Course No. DRG 216M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Sarah Kabot

In creating 100 drawings within a single semester, students will move through many forms of drawing, from direct observation to work from photographic sources, from abstraction to the idiosyncratic. Assignments are sequenced to encourage experimentation and play with a wide range of drawing materials and methods. At the conclusion of the course, students will have begun to develop their own point of view, style, and approach to drawing. Required for Sophomore Drawing Majors. Offered spring.

3-Dimensional Drawing: The Psychology of Space

Course No. DRG 38X-39X  Credits: 3.0

Through a theoretical understanding of drawing as mapping students will be asked to deal with problems of three-dimensionality in relationship to movement and time through space. Of particular interest will be concerns of mapping, spatial location and relative positioning and the ideas fourth dimensionality or the ÒhiddenÓ. Students will be asked to consider ideas of trace, residue, and rhizomatic or non-linear vs. linear progressions. Questions will include: How does the student navigate both three-dimensional and conceptual spaces? How can space be explored, mapped, studied both as a physical location and a spatial event.

BFA Thesis + Statement

Course No. VAT 493  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Christina Cassara | Lane Cooper | Sarah Kabot

This course is meant to supplement the work done in the student’s major studio classes. It focuses on preparing the BFA candidate for their exhibition, BFA Thesis Paper, Short Artist’s Statement and BFA Thesis Examination. The BFA Review process is comprised of four components: Documentation; Exhibition; BFA Thesis Paper and Short Artist’s Statement (Abstract); and BFA Thesis Examination (Oral Defense/Review). As part of the course, these requirements will be reviewed in technical terms as well as in the context of professional practices in general. The BFA thesis paper is meant to prepare the student for their BFA thesis examination and to provide the foundation for professional practices beyond graduation. It is an opportunity for an in-depth consideration of work and studio practice. Within the paper and among other questions, students are expected to address: “What is the work? What is the reasonable expectation for how it will be received by a given audience? What is the work’s historical and contemporary context? What are the sources for the work? What choices were made in realizing the work and how do they contribute to the reception of the work?” This course is open to all seniors regardless of major but is required by all Visual Arts seniors. Offered spring.

Collage + Assemblage

Course No. VAT 212-312-412  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Ingrisano

Collage and Assemblage are among the most radical innovations of the early 20th century and these forms remain relevant today as sources for innovation and experimentation. Each of these forms acknowledges the fracture of contemporary life and the ongoing need for new means of expression. This course will explore the relationship between collage and assemblage and various disciplines within the visual arts including Painting, Print, and Drawing. Students will learn to discern the significantly different effects and content of the wide range of strategies these approaches encompass. Through classroom discussion, lectures, readings, critiques and studio work students will explore the possibilities available through collage and assemblage. Emphasis will be given to the historical and contemporary studio practices associated with collage and assemblage. This course is open to all students from all majors. Students will be encouraged to apply their area of expertise to the studio work.

Criticism as Studio Practice

Course No. VAT 241-341-441  Credits: 3.0

This course will be of interest to all students maintaining a studio practice and focuses on the role of critical dialogue in forming and informing studio production. Through modern and contemporary models, students will be asked to consider the relationship between what is critically said about a work of art and how that frame effects the work's standing in the world. Examples to be considered will include: Apollinaire and Picasso; Pollock and Greenberg; Andy Warhol's practice; Andre Serrano's Piss Christ; Robert Mapplethorpe's work; Chris Ofili and the Young British Artists; and the television show "Work of Art." Students will develop and participate in projects extending from these models as well as giving an intensive look at their own practices and how what they make is changed by the critical dialogue which surrounds making in an academic environment. This course is open to all students.

Drawing as Image, Process, and Plan

Course No. DRG 21X-31X-41X  Credits: 3.0

Initial projects of the course will focus on the construction of a drawing utilizing a variety of sources including: observation, historical reference, photographs, digital images, and the imagination. Discussion will focus on contextualizing the drawing as object, locating it through the study of pertinent theory and history. In further projects students will consider the drawing as part of a larger process in developing 2-D images through a variety of media. Important to this discussion will be concerns of composition, scale, and media and their relationship to concept and content. Students will then research artists who have utilized drawing as a planning tool for film, sculpture, and other media. The focus of these projects will be on how the drawing aids the artist in conceptualizing a form in space and time.

Drawing Beyond Observation

Course No. DRG 221-321-421  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Amber Kempthorn | Christian Wulffen | Michael Meier

This course will explore strategies for representation beyond direct perception, moving past the use of the traditional still life, landscape, or model as subject. How can a drawing describe the world that is beyond the range of our common visual observations? Different approaches to drawing, including free-association, metaphor, and mapping are explored to help define and circumvent personal barriers. Required for junior Drawing majors. Offered fall.

Drawing Major Day: Drawing in Context

Course No. DRG 415M  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Ingrisano

What provides the context for a contemporary drawing? Is it the graphic novel or a classical form of figurative representation? Does it find its place in the space of the gallery or on the street? Students will explore the ways in which form and style contribute to the content of their work. Projects are student driven with an emphasis on working with each student to develop his or her ideas through research, exploration, and experimentation. Museum and gallery excursions and visiting artists are regularly scheduled to expose students to historical and contemporary artwork and practice. Required for senior Drawing majors.

It's not too late to apply

It's not too late to apply

Get started here.

Meet Your Professors view all

Josť Carlos Teixeira

Josť Carlos Teixeira

Champney Family Professor of Art

José Carlos Teixeira is currently the Champney Family Visiting Professor at Case Western Reserve Univer...more

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

Read More

Support CIA

Show the world creativity matters: make a gift to the annual fund.

Read More

SPECTRUM CIA 2015

Save the date. Four celebration events.

Read More

Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.