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Ceramics
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Academics . Ceramics . Courses

Ceramics Courses

Ceramics: The Narrative Vessel

Course No. CER 246-346-446  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Judith Salomon

The focus of this class will be the ceramic object as a vehicle for two and three-dimensional expression. We will introduce the potter's wheel, handbuilding/forming techniques along with glazing and surface treatments. Kiln firing will be introduced, including gas and electric kilns. We will discuss artworks made from clay in the past, present and future. This class is open to all: take as preparation for other course work in the Ceramics Department.

Ceramics: The Potter's Wheel: Utility + Production

Course No. CER 240-340-440  Credits: 3.0
Faculty William Brouillard

Wheel based vessels and sculptural forms will be explored in this class. The potter's wheel is an important tool for artists and designers who want to create compositional forms using multiple parts. Glaze making, glazing and kiln firing will be incorporated into this course. Lectures on historical and contemporary ceramic works will be included to further help student create a personal direction. Some wheel work suggested. Required of all Ceramic Majors. Open to all.

Creative Process + Materials Studies

Course No. CMC 200  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Kathy Buszkiewicz | William Brouillard

Students focus on the creative process and material studies across the craft majors. From inspiration to the production of multiples, each major explores design and making through their respective mediums as well as other materials. Sophomores in the Craft + Material Culture environment address common themes while working in their respective major: Ceramics, Glass, and Jewelry + Metals. The course affords the integration of skills and knowledge from foundation including drawing, design, color, digital synthesis, and collaboration, with the practices related to the full scope of the Craft + Material Culture major programs. Offered fall.

Digital Modeling + Making

Course No. CMC 301  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Matthew Hollern

Craft Core 4 explores the integration of computer-aided design (CAD) across the craft disciplines. Building on the Core 3 course, Digital Modeling and Making addresses a range of new materials and technologies toward innovative applications across the range of craft, new skills and knowledge from 3D modeling to computer aided manufacturing, and rapid prototyping. Projects integrate design and output experiences toward exploration of new materials, patterns, molds, templates, models, and objects. The seminar/ studio course includes weekly seminar discussions, presentations, and reviews as well as dedicated work in the studios, labs, and major spaces. Laptops are recommended but not required. Offered spring.

Enamel in the Public Realm

Course No. MET 250-350-450  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

The use of enamel for public, community based, collaborative, or interactive art is the focus of this course. Demonstrations will support beginning to advanced level students and will vary based on needs to complete individual projects. The emphasis for beginning students will be on the use of enamel on the two-dimensional surface. Students with metal forming experience may explore three-dimensional forms in combination with enamel.

Enamel: Advanced Projects

Course No. ENA 245A-345A-445A  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

This course will focus on advanced and experimental processes with enamel. Processes may include but are not limited to: torchfiring, electroforming, grissaille, plique-a-jour, enameling on silver and gold. Advanced students are expected to continue their exploration of the medium, focusing on enamel techniques not covered in the beginning course. Students are encouraged to explore 3-dimensional formats and large-scale applications at the same time as mastering their skills in the processes previously learned. Graduating students are generally working independently on research and production of work for the BFA exhibit. Technical demonstrations will be based on the skill level of the students enrolled each semester. Required of enamel majors. Open to electives. Prerequisite: ENA245 Enamel: Image, Surface, Relief.

Enamel: Image, Surface, Relief

Course No. MET 245  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Gretchen Goss

Fused glass (enamel) to metal is the focus of this course. Drawing and painting skills will transcend graphite, paper, oil and canvas to molten glass on metal. Transparent, opaque, liquid and dry enamels will be introduced. Experimental to traditional processes in the medium will be covered. Photographic and digitally produced images are options for resists for the acid etching process. The linear aspects of cloisonné will be considered through the fusion of formed silver and copper wires into the enamel surface.

Enamel: Major Day/Advanced Topics

Course No. ENA 246M-346M-446M  Credits: 3.0

This course will focus on advanced and experimental processes with enamel. Processes may include but are not limited to: torchfiring, electroforming, grissaille, plique-a-jour, enameling on silver and gold. Advanced students are expected to continue their exploration of the medium, focusing on enamel techniques not covered in the beginning course. Students are encouraged to explore 3-dimensional formats and large-scale applications at the same time as mastering their skills in the processes previously learned. Graduating students are generally working independently on research and production of work for the BFA exhibit. Technical demonstrations will be based on the skill level of the students enrolled each semester. Required of enamel majors. Open to electives. Prerequisite: ENA245 Enamel: Image, Surface, Relief.

Meet Your Professors view all

Amy Sinbondit

Amy Sinbondit

Technical Specialist/Adjunct Faculty

Amy Krusinski Sinbondit is a ceramic artist currently working at the Cleveland Institute of Art as the Technic...more

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