share this

Campus Connection information session: Oct. 16
See more event details here.
Share This Search

Academics . Animation . Courses

Animation Courses

Concept Development I

Course No. ANIM 201-301  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Scalmato | James Mravec | Lincoln Adams | Suzanne McGinness

A core requirement to learn digital painting in motion, scene design, character development, technical direction, and related animation production pipeline standards for developing animated stories, shorts, films, and animated cinematography. This course examines the media pro-education requirements for animation students in applied professional studios. This course serves to develop the animator's core mechanics and vocabulary in the broad areas of animation integrated workflow (story conception, storyboarding, animatics, motion studies, character flow and design, scene, set, and props (look artists), technical direction, and summary of post-production flow) to meet industry expectations and professional output. Offered spring.

Creative Resistance: Media Art in the Social Sphere

Course No. SEM 340  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Jimmy Kuehnle | Sarah Paul

This studio course will introduce students to the process and strategies of integrating social activism with media art. Through reading and discussion, the course will establish the historical and theoretical context of tactical media, hacktivism, and other media-based protest arts. We’ll look at artists’ use of a variety of media--including the news media, the Internet, locative media, surveillance technologies, genetic modification, gaming and more — to implement social commentary and criticism. Offered fall.

Drawing for Animation

Course No. ANIM 220  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Lincoln Adams

An essential course for anyone who is interested in visual storytelling. This course will teach students how to draw ideas, actions, and gestures that effectively communicate a story. Students will draw from live models in costumes, animals in motion, and create characters that capture storytelling poses. An emphasis will be placed on exaggeration, silhouetting, line of action, balance, and gesture: all of which are needed to communicate a character’s attitude and story. This course is highly recommended for animators and illustrators. Offered fall.

Experimental Animation

Course No. ANIM 240  Credits: 3.0

This course will introduce students to the history and experimental techniques used in the animation industry. Students will learn how to bring stories to life through stop-motion, charcoal drawings and mixed-media animation. Students will learn how to build sets, rig puppets, and use technology such as the green screen/lighting studio and cameras. This course serves as a great introduction to non-traditional animation for students who are interested in bringing physical materials to life. Offered spring.

Experimental Film + Video Art

Course No. PHV 240-340-440  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Sarah Paul
Prerequisite(s) Video/Digital Cinema I: Screen Grammar

This is an advanced video course, investigating the scope of symbolic and improvisatory cinematic storytelling. Students will explore unconventional methods of video acquisition, manipulation, processing, editing and display. Students will be able to delve into media hybrids, rather than established narrative forms, underscoring metaphorical poetic styles that inform the structure of the work. Emphasis is on the development of acute observational skills and innovative visualization techniques and encourages divergent thinking and cognitive flexibility. This course is for students who have a sustained interest in using video and digital cinema’s technologies as part of their art making. Required of Photo majors in the Video track. Open studio elective. Prerequisite: PHV267 Video/Digital Cinema I or signature of instructor.

Experiments in Electronic Arts

Course No. SEM 316  Credits: 3.0

This is a seminar class that guides students in the development and realization of a semester-long research project in electronic arts. Projects can be in a wide range of areas, hybrid thinking and intermedia approaches are strongly encouraged. Topics in the theory and history of contemporary art related to current and emerging practices will also be discussed. The class is designed to allow for synthesis of content from earlier studies into significant finished work that will be shown in an exhibition that is planned, managed and coordinated by the students, under the direction of the instructor.

Game Media Production II

Course No. GAME 321  Credits: 3.0

This course serves as a continuation of the fundamentals and theory application of game development. The course materials and projects will help students understand how to further develop game concepts, mechanics, interaction design, and prototype the game through the use of animation and simple interactivity. The course will require students to work individually to design game narratives, concepts, design documents (art assets, technical assets and sounds assets) and demonstrate the playability of the prototype game. The course exposes students to examples of the current work and research in game theory and narrative design, which are integral to development of successful polished games. Students will be exposed to industry-specific games with the requirement to test, analyze and review. These examples along with specific lecture topics and materials, will allow the student to understand how to continue to develop their own game projects by learning specific research methods for understanding content, players and engagement strategies. This course does not require programming skill or experience per se; however it is understood that the student usage of Unity (in the Game Development SP2014 course,) and/or UDK may be used for projects with limitations on coded interactions and time constraints. If you wish to create a digital game but do not have technical experience to achieve the full results, you will be required to show an animation of the game concept and prototype in action, with narrative, character/environmental style, GUI, HUD, scoring, mechanics, level design, and instructional prompts. Alternately, you may choose to work on a non-digital game, which notes a similar level of complexity. Please note that this course welcomes both digital and non-digital games, but that the requirements and milestones for each type of game will be somewhat different and require the development of design related documentation, assets and research. Offered spring.

Intro to 3D Animation: Character

Course No. ANIM 307A  Credits: 3.0
Faculty Anthony Scalmato | Jeff Simonetta | Pete Maric

This is an introductory course in 3D animation as an art form, with an intensive focus on of the use and development characters in animation. Successful animation breathes life into motion with clear communication of thought, emotion, narrative or experience. Any moving object is a "character" in film or animation. We will hold regular discussions and workshops on how the dialogue of an otherwise stagnant object changes and evolves when put to motion. Methods of instruction will consist of lectures, demonstrations, artist research, studio assignments, in-class lab time, and group critiques.

CIA's Animation and Game Design programs listed 5th best in the Midwest

CIA's Animation and Game Design programs listed 5th best in the Midwest

Animation Career Review names CIA's Animation and Game Design programs as fifth best in the Midwest, noting our vast classroom/studio space.

Meet Your Professors view all

Jeff Simonetta 53294125.jpgsbccomp8reduced.jpg

Jeff Simonetta

Adjunct Professor

Jeff Simonetta began his path into animation by attending Bowling Green State University. While attending Jeff...more

Cores + Connections

Our connections are your connections.

While at CIA, you'll learn from the masters through our rigorous, world-class curriculum and connect with working professionals to begin your career.

Read More

Support CIA

Show the world creativity matters: make a gift to the annual fund.

Read More


Save the date. Four celebration events.

Read More

Cores + Connections

Creating. Connecting. Building better futures.